04 Accord wont start

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#1
2004 Honda Accord LX 4cyl. Car will not start, had the battery and starter checked and both are good. Lights, radio and everything works but the car wont start. I changed the spark plugs and the fuel pump engages when you turn the car on. Here is a video of what the car is doing.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ur_-QCB9Mik&feature=youtu.be
 
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#2
The flashing green key probably means you have a security issue and your car has disabled the starter function because it thinks you are trying to steal it.
 
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#3
Mobile Dan said:
The flashing green key probably means you have a security issue and your car has disabled the starter function because it thinks you are trying to steal it.

The key flashing is normal, have a Honda Odyssey that does the same thing
 
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#4

You need to do some electrical tests at starter or relay. Have you tried to crank with gearshift lever in Neutral?
 
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#5
How do I test? Yes tried to start it in neutral with no luck

Mobile Dan said:






You need to do some electrical tests at starter or relay. Have you tried to crank with gearshift lever in Neutral?
 

billr

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#6
Edit: I have to confess that I had watched the video with sound off... With sound on, it sounds like it is trying to crank, but just barely. That would mean most of the below doesn't apply! The problem is the battery, starter (includes solenoid), or cabling. My experience is that most starter tests are useless, so it is still suspect. Instead of the small "S" terminal, check voltage on the large (WHT wire) terminal on the starter solenoid. That should be 10-12V while trying to crank, and 12-13V at all other times.

Confirm: the engine won't crank? Edit: confirm it tries to crank, but not strongenough to turn the engine.

One good way to narrow the possibilities is to attach a new wire to the "S" terminal (WHT/BLK wire) on the starter solenoid; the one small terminal. Run that wire up somewhere convenient, then measure voltage when trying to crank the engine but it won't crank. If you have 10-12V there when trying to crank, then the starter motor is bad, or the heavy cabling to it or the battery. If you don't have voltage on that small terminal when trying to crank, then we look the other way; back through the neutral/park safety switch, starter relay, remote-start, anti-theft, ignition switch, etc.

First, though, try swapping that starter relay with a similar one in the fuse/relay panel, it may be only the relay!

If you don't have 12V on that small starter solenoid terminal, there are other voltage tests that can be made at the relay socket, but they can be a little bit more complicated to describe and do safely.
 

jasonn20

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#7
More than likely if your cranking the engine and hear the starter solenoid engage (single click) and the engine rotates very slow then the armature is shorted and then you would need a starter. If the battery was low then it would click several times but it does not have the voltage/amperage to fully engage it.
 
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#8
I went back and listened to the video at full volume. If you moved key twice to crank position in the video, I would say that I could hear the starter make a little "grinding" sound twice. I have heard that design of Honda starter make that (uncharacteristic) starter sound when they go bad. Sounds like my toaster when it wants to pop up, but a bagel is stuck in it. "Grrr"

Sometimes, bad starters work fine when they are not in the car...
 
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#9
Swapped relays, checked cables, verified the starter is getting power and also tried to jump the car to see if anything would happen. Still had no luck. Guess I should just get a new starter and hope for the best?
 
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#10
Does your starter look like this?

If you can reach it, you might try supplying 12v to terminal for the smaller wire, to see if the starter operates.
 

billr

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#11
"verified the starter is getting power"

Yes, verify that means 12V to both the small wire and large cable, while cranking; and that the other meter lead is connected to the starter case for reference. If all that is true, it has to be a bad starter. It is normal for the voltage on those two wires to drop some, especially the large one, but shouldn't drop below 10V. If there is any more drop, then you still don't know if it is a battery problem, a cable problem, or the starter is bad and drawing too much current. Let's hope voltages do stay up near 12V while cranking, then you know it is the starter! Again, read those voltages relative to the starter case, otherwise we would still have to wonder about the grounding.
 
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#12
Mobile Dan said:
Does your starter look like this?

If you can reach it, you might try supplying 12v to terminal for the smaller wire, to see if the starter operates.

Yes, that is what the starter looks like. So I should run a wire from "B" directly to the battery terminal or from "A"? Thanks. And as far as trying to reach it you have to take off the intake manifold to get to it ouch

 
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#13
billr said:
"verified the starter is getting power"

Yes, verify that means 12V to both the small wire and large cable, while cranking; and that the other meter lead is connected to the starter case for reference. If all that is true, it has to be a bad starter. It is normal for the voltage on those two wires to drop some, especially the large one, but shouldn't drop below 10V. If there is any more drop, then you still don't know if it is a battery problem, a cable problem, or the starter is bad and drawing too much current. Let's hope voltages do stay up near 12V while cranking, then you know it is the starter! Again, read those voltages relative to the starter case, otherwise we would still have to wonder about the grounding.
I just checked the cables with a light, will get a multimeter and check for the voltages next.
 

billr

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#14
"A" is the one that should always have 12V, that big wire is connected directly to the battery. "B" is the one that should have 12V only when you are trying to crank the engine. You really have to be reading voltages, just a visual check isn't enough to ensure something "has power". We are kind of back to step 1 here...
 
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#15
billr said:
"A" is the one that should always have 12V, that big wire is connected directly to the battery. "B" is the one that should have 12V only when you are trying to crank the engine. You really have to be reading voltages, just a visual check isn't enough to ensure something "has power". We are kind of back to step 1 here...
It wasnt just visual, I used a volt circuit tester that looks like a screwdriver with a light on it. I will get a multimeter and check the voltages this weekend.