1970 Ford Mustang Overheating

Joined
Mar 14, 2007
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#1
Make
Ford
Model
Mustang
Year
1970
Miles
100000
Engine
302
Ive got a 1970 Mustang 302 4bbl and was driving yesterday for about 15 min and noticed the temp
gauge higher than normal, got it home and it was overheating. Today ran the engine with the cap off
and brought it to temp, never seen any fluid circulating mostly trying to come out of the filler port.
Could it be a clogged radiator? I dont drive it all the time maybe once every couple weeks depending
on the weather
Thanks Mark
 

billr

wrench
Staff member
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Mar 12, 2007
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#2
Sure, the radiator could be clogged, but there are a lot of other possibilities. Do you know the history of this car, especially any work that has been done on the cooling system? Have you drained out a bit of coolant to see what it looks like? When you observed it "overheating", what does that mean? Did you put a temp gauge in the coolant to get an actual reading?
 

grcauto

Hero Member
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May 29, 2014
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#4
Hot but no coolant movement in the radiator may mean that thermostat is not opening to allow flow.
I would second that.
Ive got a 1970 Mustang 302 4bbl and was driving yesterday for about 15 min and noticed the temp
gauge higher than normal, got it home and it was overheating. Today ran the engine with the cap off
and brought it to temp, never seen any fluid circulating mostly trying to come out of the filler port.
Could it be a clogged radiator? I dont drive it all the time maybe once every couple weeks depending
on the weather
Thanks Mark
Did the engine have pinging sounds when you turned it off? If so, that would confirm a stuck closed thermostat. Those pings are boiling coolant exploding inside the block and or cylinder heads. It would also confirm you have to little antifreeze to water ratio.
 

PC

Full Member
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Sep 3, 2007
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#5
As other posters have said, could be many things. Lower hose should have a spring inside, else suction from the water pump will collapse the hose and block the return from the radiator. Stuck thermostat is also a possibility. Could also install a mechanical water temp gauge as difficult to determine actual temp from factory gauge. Back in the day of big engines and high horsepower would wind that factory temp gauge pretty far, but they still wouldn't boil over if the cooling system was in good shape. Draw off some coolant to check condition. Another remote possibility is a blown head gasket pushing exhaust into the cooling system, but this would usually cause coolant to accumulate in one cylinder after a cool down.