2001 Buick Lesabre Limited Fuel Pump MOdule

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#1
I don't know if I have a problem or not on this new AC Delco fuel pump module I just bought brand new. It concerns the fuel pump strainer sock. At first I did not see a fuel pump strainer with it. The pictures I see of the AC delco MU1791 module show a strainer attached to the outside bottom of the module fuel reserve. Of course these pictures may just be a stock picture and not the actual one I have. The strainers I see selling individual on the net would not even have a place to fit on the outside of the module canister.
I took a closer look inside the module where the fuel pump goes and see a strainer attached to the fuel pump inside the module, running up the side, and not on the outside bottom of the module. My question is, does this updated module have the strainer on the inside of the module and do away with the one on the outside bottom of the module. Or are they susposed to be one on the outside and one on the inside. Any help would surely be appeciated. Thanks Kelly
 
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#2
Yeah, I got a problem alright. This pump is not a AC Delco pump Mu 1791. It is a Airtex E3518M packaged in a box marked as MU1791 with a AC delco label . Detroit Michigan on the box. It was advertised as a AC Delco, not an Airtex. Trying to get my money back now. Waiting to hear back from the seller now.
 
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#3
Sounds like an ebay purchase. Did you read all the fine print or ask the seller a question before buying?
 
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Right on NickD. Read all the fine print and it says what every AC DELCO you order says from Amazon, Rock Auto, and others. That this product is made by independent vendors and packaged in a box labled AC DELCO . It may look different but has the same quality that the original AC DELCO product has. The box that the pump came in had never been opened and the box was labled like it was from a AC DELCO manufacturer. I have been researching this on the net and really have no idea who this was made by now. I am very confused. It looks like a Airtex, but a GM Tech information bulletin in June and July show that it may be a new type AC PUMP with only 2 guide bars instead of three, no fuel sock on the bottom of the fuel resevoir, and internal spring on the bottom of the 2 bars instead of the spring on the outside of the bars. Various statements online by individual buyers show that they have the same problem with other good dealers such as Amazon, Rock Auto and other reputable vendors. Like you have said before yourself NickD, there is no more AC DELCO, it is all aftermarket independent dealers. You don't know if you are getting an Airtex, or what ever. Example: Amazon show a three bar guide pump and you get a two bar pump.. Go figure!!
 
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#5
I would suggest taking it to a Buick Parts Dept. and get an opinion from them. May or may not help, but it would be a second or third opinion.
 
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I found on another site that this person had the same pump, no bottom strainer, no ac delco marks. He even had the pictures and it looked exactly like mine. He sent the pictures to the GM support site as the support site suggested and they emailed him back saying that it was a AC Delco pump indeed and that it was the newer version that did away with the bottom strainer and just has the improved verson of the screen inside of the pump reservoir hooked to the pump. I also have found one version of aDelphi pump FG-0162 that looked exactly line mine with no bottom strainer on the outside of the module and no place for place for it either, and it had the Delphi labels on the pump. But I also saw the same number of the Delphi FG-0162 on another site that looked like mine but had a bottom strainer on the outside of the module. Go figure! One side of me tells me to send it back and another says to just go ahead and install it. Confused in Ohio!!
 

billr

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#7
I would be tempted to use it, especially if there is a filter up-stream from it. It's getting pretty hard to find the "right" parts these days; you might go to a lot of effort and never come up with anything better.
 
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#8
I think it is a Delphi fg-0162 for this lesabre. The locking clip on the wriring connector on the top of the actual fuel pump has "Delphi" inscribed on it, whatever that's worth! You are right billr, I would have to pay for the shipping back to get my money back, and when I ordered another, who know what version I would get. AC version, Delphi Version, Airtex version, Spectra version, who knows. AC Delco has contracted out their pumps to different manufacturers and they all have their different version of the pump. I know one thing, I will not throw out my pump I have in this car now. It does run. It is just that the sending unit is bad. I think I will just put in it and hope I don't break down on the road in a monthor two.
 
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#9
Use it. It could be better or worse than whatever you might replace it with. Just hope they really improved it not just cheapened it. Over thinking can drive one crazy.
My $.02
 

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#10
Yeah, give it a go if you can't get your money back, especially since you don't have to drop the tank to get at it. ;)
 
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#11


Kind of expensive for a piece of plastic, 225 bucks at rockauto for the complete module, didn't find just the pump, but guess they figure the whole thing should be pitched.



Then with that super cheap carbon ink resistor for the float.

Pump itself uses a very small armature with three thin copper strips on the end for the commutator, does use carbon brushes about an inch long, but with linear springs. Compression force is great at first as is brush wear, but that tension eases as the brushes wear. This is the cheapest way to do this. Uses a direct drive piece of plastic vane with a notch on the shaft, vane is about 1/2" diameter, bearing on either end are formed in plastic end plates. 12 V is applied directly to the brushes, back then for a permanent magnet field, was machined. Now mixing iron filings with ceramic and baking those, super cheap. Check valve is a piece of rubber that snaps into that plastic end plate.

Guess that strainer was also too expensive, typically made of nylon but formed in a mold as one piece.

When you grew up in a country where you could buy all the parts to completely rebuild a die cast metal pump, just needed the housing, for a buck. And see how things are changing, feel we are getting robbed blind.
 
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#12
Oh I could have returned it within 14 days less shipping charges, no problem by the seller. With research I found out this probably was a delphi, but definetly not a AC Delco. I didn't get rip off by the price, but I didn't get the best deal either. Shame on me! But I went ahead and took the old one out and put the new one in today. Had to make a tool to turn the hold down ring for the fuel pump because It just would not engage completely with a non steel chisel. I am glad I bought a new ring, the old rings was pretty rusted up and weak. I have enough one time usage tools in my tool box. I just did not feel like spending 50 to 70 dollars for a new tool that would have did the job. Just have to splice in the new connect for the new pump tomorrow.

Look at those two pump NickD. The top photo is the one I have with no filter on the bottom and the fuel level sensor resistor setting vertical and going north to south. The second photo being not mine, has a filter and the fuel level sensor resistor set horizonal and going east to west. And guess what, They are the same number on the pump.

And for the reason I took the good running pump out in the first place is that the fuel level sender resistor was bad. I found out by looking at the old resistor that one of the fingers had a broken parts out of one of the finger and scratched up that part of the resistor. Also the bearing for the swivel was slopping and making poor contact. The new resistor that come with the new pump has modified fingers with like rolls on the end of the fingers instead of just curved up like the old resistor. Well at least I still have the old pump.
 
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#13
Let me guess, took a steel bar about 15" long, drilled a couple of holes in it, I tapped mine, install a couple of 5/16" bolts spaced for those notches and cut off the heads with a height to clear all that stuff on top. Using scrape, saved yourself 75 bucks to get the job done.

Can always find rust, find myself using the outlet side of a shop vac to blow out all the remaining fumes in the tank. Even on some, used soap and water, flushed it out, then again with the outlet of the vac to blow it dry. Then painted the tank after a good cleaning.

This is the one out of my P-30, didn't take any photos from other vehicles.



Don't spare the RTV to augment the seal after changing the fuel pump, or end up with evaporative codes. Newer vehicles are using plastic, haven't figured out if that is a blessing or not, but does save some work.
 

billr

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#14
Common silicone RTV doesn't hold up to gasoline. Go to a boat shop and get a tube of polysulfide. Permatex and Loctite also probably offer gasoline-proof "RTV" sealants.
 
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#15
Could not find a bar, long flat stock or anytfing like that. Thought about doing what you just described, but no material. Found a "L" shelf bracket made out of 3/16 flat stock sitting around. I flattened it out to be straight and bend it over t o suit me. Ground notches in the bottome so it would not slip off of the locking ring. Used a couple pipe wrenches to turn it for now. If needed again I will modify it so as to turn it with a more suitable tool.

Too late for any sealing compound, It is installed and running fine so far with no codes. Tim will tell.
I think ac delco did away with the third bar on the fuel pump to cut down on the cost of manufacturing. I think the reason for some having 2 filters on the pump, (one outside on the bottom of the module and one on the inside in the resevoir), and just one on the inside of the resevoir, is because some have plastic tanks like mine that won't rust and some have steel tank . I think they don't need the extra filter on plastic tanks. Could be a big mistake, I hope not. My filter on the outside of my module was clean as a pin. It was the locking ring on mine that about rusted out and caused all of the rust. It was not the tank.

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