2003 Mitsubishi Lancer - No fuel

Friday

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#1
:ROFL Before you all start laughing, yes, this is the same car. The no-spark condition has been solved. Car fires but won't start. Car will start if gas or starting fluid is spayed into the throttle body. Is this an indication that the injectors are working ok? Fuel pump was replaced a few months ago. I suspect the install is bad. Son-in-law installed. He is convinced there is a second filter on the car that is clogged. I cannot find anything that supports this. I am suspect of the new fuel pump. I cannot feel it run with key on, but 'think' I feel it running after cranking engine for a few seconds. Shouldn't it run with key on? We still have the back seat out, and access cover off.
 
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#2
You should be able to hear it when you first turn the key on....Here are a couple more diagrams that might help....Jim.........If the fuel pump will not operate, check by using the following procedure. If normal, check the fuel pump drive circuit.
Turn the ignition switch to the "LOCK" (OFF) position.
Remove the rear seat assembly
Remove the protector.
Disconnect the fuel pump module connector.
When the fuel pump drive connector is attached directly to the battery, check if the sound of the fuel pump operation can be heard.
NOTE: As the fuel pump is an in-tank type, the fuel pump sound is hard to hear. Remove the fuel tank filler tube cap and check from the tank inlet.



Check for fuel pressure by pinching the fuel hose with fingertips.
Connect the fuel pump module connector.
Install the protector and rear seat assembly.


[attachment deleted during maintenance]
 

billr

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#3
Spraying fuel into the TB bypasses all of the fuel system, so injectors are not ruled out yet.
 

Friday

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#4
Jim: thanks as always for excellent advice and diagrams. Tonight I only had time for one test. With key on, pump was not running. Verified with seat out of car and protector off. Removed the connector from fuel pump and applied 12V to pin 5 and ground to pin 4, and pump ran fine. That was all the time I had. I did remove the two fuel pump relays and visually inspected them, but did not have time to run the diagnostic on the connectors at the junction block. I plan on doing that tomorrow night.

I have to ask this question. If I apply 12V from a separate power source to the fuel pump, can I try to start the car, or is there a danger in doing that? I just want to see if the car will start, I know there are other things going on in that harness for the car to run properly.
 
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#5
The only danger in powering the fuel pump from another source would be if you had a leaking injector, and the pump ran long enough to push enough fuel through the injector to fill the cylinder with enough fuel to hydro-lock the motor and bent a connecting rod.

So...try to start it within a few seconds after powering up the pump, and remove power from the pump as soon as you quit cranking or, (more optimistically,) shut off the motor.
 

Friday

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#6
Danica said:
The only danger in powering the fuel pump from another source would be if you had a leaking injector, and the pump ran long enough to push enough fuel through the injector to fill the cylinder with enough fuel to hydro-lock the motor and bent a connecting rod. So...try to start it within a few seconds after powering up the pump, and remove power from the pump as soon as you quit cranking or, (more optimistically,) shut off the motor.
Got it. Thanks. I will man the power connection to the pump, and have son-in-law try to start car. That way I can cut it off immediately.
 

Friday

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#7
Okay. Went over and put 12V power to the fuel pump. Let it run for a second or two then cranked the engine. It would not start. Disconnected the fuel line at the fuel pressure regulator and put the 12V to the pump again. No fuel came out. I don't know if that is indicative of anything or not, do I need to disconnect the main fuel line at the fuel rail?

Ran Jim's diagnostic on the fuel pump relay connectors. Relay number one showed continuity with a reading of 9.4 ohms. Relay number two did not show continuity (OL). I did not have time tonight to run the second diagnostic where you apply power to the relay connectors. I will try to do that tomorrow night.
 

billr

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#8
If I have looked at the correct picture of your fuel-pressure regulator (FRP), it has hose "barbs" for the manifold vacuum and fuel return. The pressure connection is a nipple with O-ring that pokes into the fuel rail. Whether you are talking about the pressure port (hole in fuel rail) or the return barb on FRP makes little difference; either should have fuel coming out when the pump is running. If you are testing at the return barb, then pull the FRP off of the rail and try again. Still no fuel flow at all out of the hole in the rail? Then something is really plugged up (not so likely) or the pump is gone. If you can disconnect the pressure line back at the tank and try, then no-fuel would definitely condemn the pump...
 
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#9
Got gas?

The fuel pump will run without fuel. Sometimes a rookie pump replacer fouls up the level sensor and the gauge never drops to 'E' because the float is hung up.
 

Friday

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#10
Danica said:
Got gas?

The fuel pump will run without fuel. Sometimes a rookie pump replacer fouls up the level sensor and the gauge never drops to 'E' because the float is hung up.
LOL!!! Yes, it has gas. I put it in there myself. ;D
 

Friday

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#11
billr said:
If I have looked at the correct picture of your fuel-pressure regulator (FRP), it has hose "barbs" for the manifold vacuum and fuel return. The pressure connection is a nipple with O-ring that pokes into the fuel rail. Whether you are talking about the pressure port (hole in fuel rail) or the return barb on FRP makes little difference; either should have fuel coming out when the pump is running. If you are testing at the return barb, then pull the FRP off of the rail and try again. Still no fuel flow at all out of the hole in the rail? Then something is really plugged up (not so likely) or the pump is gone. If you can disconnect the pressure line back at the tank and try, then no-fuel would definitely condemn the pump...
Okay. I had thought of trying at the pump. Risky on this car. No power to the pump means I am applying power back there to the terminals. Methinks External power + Me + fuel pump = car fire...
 
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#12
Rubber hose + Clear container (think, 2 liter Pepsi) + adequate ventilation = no emergency.

Use caution when removing pressure line, just in case it is holding pressure.
 

billr

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#13
Ha! I hadn't even thought about "no fuel", Danica. I did think about warning of fire danger, but Friday seems savvy enough that I felt that might be condescending. I feel better now that common-sense safety has been mentioned by all.
 

Friday

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#14
billr said:
Ha! I hadn't even thought about "no fuel", Danica. I did think about warning of fire danger, but Friday seems savvy enough that I felt that might be condescending. I feel better now that common-sense safety has been mentioned by all.
Last night when I was applying 12V to the pump, I got a little spark at the positive terminal. That made me think of it...