2004 Taurus DOHC 3.0 V6 Acceleration Stumble/Hesitation

itlnstln

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#1
I've got a 2004 Taurus DOHC 3.0 V6 that every once in a while would have problems accelerating. At first I thought this would have been just some dirty injectors so I just used some injector cleaner. The problem stopped for a little while but then came back stronger. Lately the car has had this problem more frequently and severely. Today tried to stall several times and did stall at one stop light but started back up by itself and did so several times afterwards. Now the car is sitting outside and I'm sure that once I get back in it, it will drive fine for a little while and then the problem will come back when I'm having a good day. What should I check that will help me pinpoint this problem?

Thanks so much in advance this problem has become so frustrating,
Enos
 
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Leala

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#2
Good luck! We have two 2003 Taurus with the same problem. The hesitation and stalling started before they had 20K miles but the dealership kept telling us to come back and they would take a look at it. They have not been able to fix the problem and neither has another Ford dealership. We called the Ford consumer line many times and Ford has done not a thing. Finally, we read in the warranty book about requesting arbitration and we requested two packets. The response was that Ford had the BBB send us a two page form (and the form looked liked it had been photocopied a million times) that we are supposed to complete and send in with all the details. The cars are still under warranty so we find Ford Motor Company's lack of concern reprehensible. Both of these 2003 Ford cars are dangerous. We filed a complaint with NHTSA and they reviewed the complaint but they are not even going to investigate the complaint. Also, I had to call NHTSA to find out the status because they do not communicate ever with consumers who file complaints. I think we are going to have to sue Ford Motor Company because they cannot or will not respond to us. Now, if we only had one 2003 with the problem, then maybe it is bad luck. But with two 2003 Ford Taurus with the exact same problem, that indicates there is a serious problem. I got scared out of my wits one day when I was on the highway and the car started stalling out and there was a truck behind me.
 

Transman

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#3
The only really common thing we see on fords in the shop are the vacuum lines to the pcv mainly get all mushy and gooey. They leak vacuum and cause rough idling and in more extreme cases stalling. the check engine light does come on eventually and the code is p0174 or p0171 or both. We have not had one in the shop that had a chronic stall that we could not repair. I must assume that you live in an area that has no or few qualified technicians. Try another ford dealer would be my suggestion, since you are still under warranty. Good Luck, Transman
 

autodr

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#4
The fuel pumps are junk. I'm not saying that is the problem, but rather I am saying that particular close attention needs to be paid to the fuel pressure during the stalling and acceleration problem.... for all 3 vehicles mentioned in this thread.

I see quite a few of them here Ford dealer in South Carolina.. more so the 2004 than the 2003, but the '03's description fits the bill.

Close attention must be paid, not to just the fuel pressure, but also the fuel pump "on" percentage commanded by the PCM to achieve the target fuel pressure. For example, a desired fuel pressure of 40 psi, with an actual pressure of 40psi at 23% fuel pump "on" command at idle is "good"... but... a desired pressure of 40psi, with an actual of 40psi at saaayyy 40% "on" command at idle is "bad" because... yes it is achieving "target pressure"... but.. the fuel pump is nearly at max efforts at the 40% "on" command from the PCM to achieve the desired pressure with nothing left over for sudden acceleration. The fuel pump should always be able to deliver a complete "over kill" of supply to the engine than what the engine needs to run, it should never be at it's max ability to meet the engine's demand.

If a tech only looks at the pressure on those, and not also consider how hard the pump has to work to achieve that pressure, then he may over look a problem with the pump that has to get so bad that the car will barely run to be able to catch.
 
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bob1

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#5
itlnstln said:
I've got a 2004 Taurus DOHC 3.0 V6 that every once in a while would have problems accelerating. At first I thought this would have been just some dirty injectors so I just used some injector cleaner. The problem stopped for a little while but then came back stronger. Lately the car has had this problem more frequently and severely. Today tried to stall several times and did stall at one stop light but started back up by itself and did so several times afterwards. Now the car is sitting outside and I'm sure that once I get back in it, it will drive fine for a little while and then the problem will come back when I'm having a good day. What should I check that will help me pinpoint this problem?

Thanks so much in advance this problem has become so frustrating,
Enos
Just a guess.....
Do you have codes or a check engine light? Do you have a scanner that can check the BARO parameter or measured air flow(check health of MAF)?
Could this be a dirty MAF sensor? More info can be found online by google.
 
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#6
Had a 99 Taurus that would Hesitate or Stumble very badly once the engine warmed up, intermittently. I replaced the Idle Air Control ($50) http://autorepair.about.com/cs/generalinfo/l/bldef_333.htm

It is on top of the engine, two bolts, one electrical connector. Looks like a "C" battery with a lip.

I am under the impression the electric motor/solenoid failed with heat, because I was able to measure the resistance in Ohms with a multi-meter to confirm much greater difference in resistance with heat/cold, sometimes no resistance (open, failed solenoid!). This suggestion to measure the resistance of the unit fix paid for the haynes/chilton manual.
 

itlnstln

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#7
Okay, I've now got an AutoTap scanner. What can I and should I check using the tool to help me pin point the problem? Also how do I go about testing the IAC valve?

Thanks in advance,
Enos
 

Transman

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#8
The first thing you need to do is pull codes and post them here. Have you checked for bad vacuum lines around the engine? Experience proves it's usually the basics that cause most of the problems, vacuum lines, spark plugs, pcv valve, etc. even dirty connections at the battery will cause problems. Post back, Transman
 

itlnstln

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#9
I just checked for codes and there are none stored. I've checked the vacuum lines before but I'm not sure how well I did. I was told to check for leaks using a small propane tank around the intake vacuum lines. I tried that but nothing happened, the engine didn't speed up or anything like that. I would check more vacuum lines but I don't know where they are located. Is there a better way to check for vacuum leaks?
 

Transman

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#10
A smoke machine would be my recommendation but not everyone has one. I use a water bottle and spray around suspected areas. On the older cars the idle would flutter when you hit the leak but today's computers are so quick that anything that would effect the idle is compensated for before you hear it. Use a water bottle and listen for suction sounds, like the straw in the bottom of a shake trying to get the last out of the cup. Squeeze the hoses looking for cracks, overly soft or sticky hoses, on fords pay special attention to the pcv hoses. Post back, Transman
 
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Mike T3

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#11
your codes probably indicate lean bank 1 or 2. It is not your IAC valvee, mass air flow sensor, or fuel pump driver module. Even if the reader says FPD module. your PCV hose has probably collapsed to the intake and needs to be replaced. The actual culprit is the intake plenum gaskets where they cotact the block. the other parts are going to waste your time and money. :stop