2007 Pontiac G6 Hardtop Convertible.

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#31
Ha, wouldn't be concerned about patents or trademarks, lever patents in the US Patent Office are as old as Archimedes' himself. Best they can do is to get a design arts patent, move one hole a millimeter, and would void it. Besides doing this for yourself, and not for personal gain and going public with it.

Where my curiosity lies in this design with the roof midway, how much can you move this roof laterally? Usually on designs like this, they have guides at the end of travel to properly aligned these long levers for proper closure. We eliminated the possibility that you didn't do anything wrong when you pushed the button to close this thing. It broke all by it's lonesome self.

Since no one was injured in this closure, really don't have a complaint to NHTSA, but if the possibility exists, would.

When we voted for guys that promised less government and deregulation, must have been thinking about the IRS and the tax assessor. Not the FTC that was the first to go or deregulation on heath insurers.
 
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#32
Nick D thanks for the comments. We are having the part removed on Thursday. I will keep you posted.
And I will likely try to take it to Our Tech School for Mechanics here in Sarasota and show the problem and see if they know of someone who can make the Hinges. (if that is the only thing needed to get this to work again)

Also we have now been escalated to the GM Executive Department and I had a call from a person called an "Executive Assistant". Not sure what they will do - but at least someone at GM has decided to move it to a higher level than simply their response team.
joe
 
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#35
Just based on the theory, if it happened once, will happen again. It started to rain, you pulled over and pushed the button, then it crashed.

Not just an isolated incident, you are not the only one.
 
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#36
Nick B.........I am not sure I know how to use this attachment. I tried. I will send them to your email address like last time. Please send them to whomever you like.
joe
 

billr

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#37
Those photos are still on the Automotive Products forum, Nickd could just look there...
 
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#38
Or move it here,



See this photo was taken through the rear window, but sure looks like a die cast aluminum part. Haven't done this for awhile, checking my old brain, think I forgot my shrinkage formulas. But would make a duplicate in my wood working shop out of mahogany. Had one of two choices, Neillsville had a foundry, cast iron, or Chippewa Falls, for aluminum.

Judging by looking at the cracks, looks like GM used a very low grade of aluminum, doubt if it could be brazed. Aircraft grade was only a few cents more. Going back about 30 years, but with my patterns, would expect to pay around 20 bucks for a part like this. Literally, hundreds of different grades of aluminum. Can see that purchasing agent now, give me the cheapest. Aircraft grade was at least three times stronger as I recall and had more elasticity.

If this happened to me, would be upset, putting it nicely.
 

nickb2

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#39
Yeah, like I said before, those hinges are not plastic. If they are, someone needs to be shot. Tried again today and still no luck. What a weird problem to solve.

The actual fixing it is a simple thing, I posted how to adjust and what not etc. It just a matter of finding them or making them. So to parrot what I said before, I would just make my own. Problem solved.
 

nickb2

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#41
For that last post, first off it should be in the import forum, and lastly, if that key won't come out, my $.02 you need a new lock cylinder or a locksmith and new key :idea:
 
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#42
Was kind of expecting a report back from NoSweat, not an ignition key removal problem in a Mazda. Use to be just an ignition switch with added chores of locking the steering wheel and the shift lever in park. Claim this was done for our protection to prevent thief, but sure a nightmare to work on when they jam. Start a new thread, and explain your circumstance.
 
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#43
Or move it here,



See this photo was taken through the rear window, but sure looks like a die cast aluminum part. Haven't done this for awhile, checking my old brain, think I forgot my shrinkage formulas. But would make a duplicate in my wood working shop out of mahogany. Had one of two choices, Neillsville had a foundry, cast iron, or Chippewa Falls, for aluminum.

Judging by looking at the cracks, looks like GM used a very low grade of aluminum, doubt if it could be brazed. Aircraft grade was only a few cents more. Going back about 30 years, but with my patterns, would expect to pay around 20 bucks for a part like this. Literally, hundreds of different grades of aluminum. Can see that purchasing agent now, give me the cheapest. Aircraft grade was at least three times stronger as I recall and had more elasticity.

If this happened to me, would be upset, putting it nicely.
have a g 6 also and those hinges broke cant get anywhere so a guy 3d them and got them made out of billet aluninum