Briggs & Stratton made by Jiangsu Jiangdong Group?

Discussion in 'Small Engines' started by billr, May 1, 2015.

  1. billr

    billr wrench Staff Member

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    It's been a while now, huh? Wish me (good) luck again... the engine seized today. Actually, it probably was seizing yesterday, but seemed OK today when when we went to use it again; seized after about an hour and it got good-and-hot. We need to use the machine tomorrow, but I have found that air-cooled engines can have "benign" seizure and still live. It think the cause of heating/seizing is because the machine design direct the exhaust so it is a primary source for engine intake and cooling. I'll fix that tomorrow with a die-grinder, make a real exhaust port!
     
  2. billr

    billr wrench Staff Member

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    No joy, the rod welded itself to the crank journal. Any body know of a way to strip aluminum from ferrous, either chemical-only or in cahoots with electricity? The rod and gaskets are cheap enough, but if I have to buy a crank ($90) I may scrap it.
     
  3. JackC

    JackC wrench

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    Bill: ask a good machine shop, if you can find one anymore.
     
  4. billr

    billr wrench Staff Member

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    IMG_2448.JPG IMG_2449.JPG IMG_2448.JPG IMG_2449.JPG Here is what it looks like.

    The other photo is a little speedo gear I made for my Saturn. I made a mold off of the broken (red) one, then cast the new from JBWeld. I could buy a new gear for $30, but that would be more expensive than if it was made of gold, since it is only a few tenths of a gram. I'm just too frugal for that...

    I gotta say... adding attachments is a lot clumsier now, not nearly as intuitive as it used to be!
     

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  5. JackC

    JackC wrench

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    Bill, I just thought of something. When I was 20 and tried to weld aluminum I discovered that it disappeared before my very eyes if I got it too hot.
    Because of its low incineration point (or whatever it is called) perhaps you could heat it up and have it run off (disappear) before the steel crank would care.
     
  6. billr

    billr wrench Staff Member

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    I dismissed melting the aluminum because I know the crank would be red-hot before the aluminum went away. I worked in-and-around an aluminum foundry for a number of years ('till just recently, actually) and have had to melt aluminum out of places where "it didn't belong" many times; it ain't easy. Sodium hydroxide works to strip the aluminum off, I have the crank pretty much down now, just a bit more polishing on the journal to do.

    Now to the ugly... I woke up this morning with every intention of ordering a new rod, crank, and gaskets; was going to go for the new crank because I hadn't cleaned the old one yet and it wasn't clear to me that it could be saved. Well, all the parts I wanted to order were on factory back-order and delivery would be at least 2-3 weeks. So, I went to work on the crank and now am trying to figure out a way to repair the rod. There are no bearing inserts on this, the aluminum rod is the bearing surface. I am toying with several ideas, but whatever it is has to be done in the next day or two:
    1) make a new rod out of a billet of aluminum (lots of machining to do!)
    2) find appropriate bearing insets and machine the rod big-end to fit (anybody know of a 36mm nominal bearing, does Federal-Mogul have size listings?)
    3) make aluminum bearing inserts (most likely to do)
    4) open rod end up and pour babbitt bearing surfaces
    5) build up rod big-end with weld and machine back to size (will lose any heat-treat in rod, difficult to weld oily aluminum, probably a poor finish on new bearing surface, maybe even destroy rod trying to weld)

    None of those are terribly easy to do, so I'm going to think about it over-night. I have the rod fixtured on my mill with the small-end true to the quill axis, ready to start boring the junk out of the big-end. Can't wait for tomorrow...
     
  7. billr

    billr wrench Staff Member

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    Nobody asked, but I'm going to tell anyway...

    I bored out the rod big-end and made bearing inserts out of aluminum. I have 10-20 hrs. of run-time on it now, under normal speed/load. I hope it is fixed!
     
  8. JackC

    JackC wrench

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    You amaze me. Great job. Not many, if anybody would be able to do that today.

    BTW, the old '89 Buick is running great and looking good. Thanks again for helping me save her.
     
  9. billr

    billr wrench Staff Member

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    I'm in NE right now, on my way to WI in that '97 with a "sick" (P1870) 460LE trans. How's that for brave? Gas here is a low as $2.25/gal...
     
  10. billr

    billr wrench Staff Member

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    A bit of trivia that may be useful:

    The carb on this B&S engine has no adjustment for the fuel mixture. I found that it hardly runs without the air filter installed so as to restrict the intake. Without the filter I could only keep it running by keeping the choke closed a bit, so I discovered this quirk quickly, but it might trip somebody else up...
     

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