check engine light came on

R

Rob

Guest
#1
Hi I have a 2000 Toyota Tundra V 8 4.7 51,000 The check engine light came on I got a code for a Heated oxygen sensor on bank 2. Is they a way to check the sensor and the wire going to it be for I go out and buy a new sensor.
 

Paul

I'm The Decider
Joined
Nov 14, 2006
Messages
1,576
Likes
0
Points
36
Location
Usa
#2
Post the code number and we should be able to help you out.
 

jjm

Hero Member
Joined
Dec 1, 2006
Messages
349
Likes
0
Points
0
Location
NYC
#3
These guessing games are getting really annoying... you got a code, CARE TO SHARE WITH US WHAT IS??? P0150? P0153? P0155? P0156? P0161? Sensor 1 on Bank 2 or Sensor 2 on Bank 2? Makes a difference. Code would be nice.

Joe

If you found this information helpful, please support BATAuto!

 

2POINTautO

Hero Member
Joined
Apr 27, 2007
Messages
379
Likes
0
Points
0
#5
Have only seen this once, the truck had a total of 5 O2 sensors put in it over a short period of time. It ended up needing a MAF Sensor that was killing O2 Sensors. Four were under warantee at the dealer. That was a 2000 Tundra P0155. I am sure whatever the other guys say is more than likely your problem.

I recommend at least getting the O2S scandata looked at by a shop with a scanner, are you having any drivability issues or just a light. The freeze frame data will tell the tech what the scenario was at the time the code was set. Let us know, this will help. Do not erase the code until you get the data, then erase the code and then let us know how long, how many drives it took to turn the light back on again.

This is my week for MAF issues here.
 
R

Rob

Guest
#6
I had some one at Auto Zone put a scanner on it and he gave me a code of P0155
I'm not having any other issues other then the check engine light on.
About 3 weeks ago Toyota put in a new starter I was told the exhaust had to be removed the starter was done under warranty That's way I was asking if I can check the oxygen sensor and wire going to it I'm no longer cover under warranty.
I may just go and buy a code scanner. Anything I should look for in a scanner?
I'm looking at a Actron model CP9150
Thanks for the Help
 

jjm

Hero Member
Joined
Dec 1, 2006
Messages
349
Likes
0
Points
0
Location
NYC
#7
Ahhhhh... now that's more like it.

I don't blame you for wanting to test the sensor at $138.89 list from Toyota (89465-34140).

First, check EFI fuse #2 (heater circuit) to make sure it's not blown. Second, goto the sensor - RH front manifold. Disconnector the connector and on the SENSOR side, and check the resistance between the +B terminal (RED WIRE) and HT (YELLOW WIRE). Should be 11-16 ohms at 68F (cold) and 23-32 ohms at 1,472F (hot). Chances are yours will read open (infinity) in which case you'll replace the sensor.

The reason why you have no driveability problems is because the problem is only with the heater circuit; the rest of the sensor is fine. Common failure.

Joe

If you found this information helpful, please support BATAuto!

 

2POINTautO

Hero Member
Joined
Apr 27, 2007
Messages
379
Likes
0
Points
0
#8
Is the sensor in question on the manifold that was removed, if so then the sensor could have been unplugged during the starter change, the vehicle could have been started momentarily to test the starter and then the manifold put back on and the sensor plugged back in after key on engine on.

If this is possible then the shop created the code by turning the key on with the sensor unplugged, if this does not seem possible then of course carry on with the resistance test and voltage test.

Do not buy your own scanner unless it is an enhanced scanner, a DIYer has no need to spend that kind of money if you can get it scanned at Autozone for free.

Go ahead and have the code cleared, test drive it for several cycles and see if the light comes back on, if it comes back on immedietly, either the code did not clear or you have an open circuit as jjm stated. Only buy an OEM sensor if you are actually going to replace it.

A little theory here for you. Heaters were installed in O2 sensors to heat it up quicker that the non heater type to help it start working sooner to help prevent pollution sooner. Now without the heater, your normal exhaust temp will heat up the sensor and it is probably working just fine, it just needs more time to start working. Now for the bad part, depending on how far downstream the sensor is and your driving habits, such as city idling stops, the exhaust system does not stay hot enough to keep the sensor hot and it goes back into Open Loop and now your vehicle runs rich or lean on that side of the engine. This equals more codes and problems later. That is just a possibility on some types of vehicles, maybe not on yours.

A little more for you to think about before you buy a sensor, is yours easy to get a tool in there to remove and replace it?