Daughter's cruise control is fixed, and she is really happy !!!! (so is Dad)

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#1
Make
Ford
Model
F150
Year
2004
Miles
190000
Engine
4.6L V8
Guys, good news. I ended up taking the truck to our local Ford dealer for the reflash because I was running out of vacation and had other things I had been tryuing to get done that need to be done. The reflash cured the problem. It wasn't too expensive, just $65.00. Nickb2, I looked into your suggestions for Ford software and interfaces, and I'm going to invest to repair my next problem, harsh shifts on my 2012 Fusion transmission. There is a TSB out on this problem. As soon as I get all of the info together, I will post all of the symptoms and a link to the TSB. You guys on here are great and I appreciate all of your help. Stay tuned for the next problem!
 

jd

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#2
Double Dips of GOOD on YOU! Dad is supposed to fix Daughter's Vehicle!
 

nickb2

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#3
Double wow. 1st, I never would have thought a reflash would have cured this cruise problem. 2nd, 65$ is a great price for a reflash at a dealer.

A good technician/garage is like a dentist. Once you find a good one, stick with!!

@DieselDon, yeah, you will have fun with the hardware and software. I know I do.

I am happy all it took was a flash, cuz everything was pointing to a PCM issue, which this actually was, but in your case the flash worked, but if that didn't work, you would have been stuck buying a new/used pcm and reflashing it anyways. Who knows what that would have cost?

Fathers day is coming up, hope you get a nice gift. A t shirt like this would be nice. Screenshot (215).png
 
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#4
OBD I that died in 1995 was using PROM, code was burnt into the chip and would never change, could even copy the code from an OEM chip and burnt in a duplicate.

Marketing was key for flashram that started in 1996, just a few electrons trapped in an FET gate or not was the difference between having a logical 0 or a 1. Internet became popular, suppose to be good for two years. PROM burnt chips, regardless of size cost about 89 cents to produce, but had to be mailed out, never failed anyway. Does take time to look up your VIN, and the code you are looking for to reflash the code, and may have memory that is subject to what we call migration leakage, it doubles with every 10*C increase in ambient temperature. Engineers were against this, but marketing always wins.

Another advantage of flashram, guys writing the code can get sloppy, so can be refreshed with firmware updates. Kind of like my 2017 Hyundai Elantra Limited, can reflash all the code at home with a WiFi connection with exception of the ECM, for whatever strange reason, only the dealer can do this due to emission requirements.

Really important to have a good battery and clean electrical connections for 22 years now, battery filters out the large spikes produced by the alternator that can erase your codes. When OBD II came out, started paying for towing insurance, not a damned thing I can do on the road to restore code.
 
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#5
You made a very good point. it makes sense that the EEPROM chips can "leak off" code. It has never occurred to me that this can happen because most of the industrial electronics I work with automatically refresh the internal memory. Also, the PLC's we have on site back up to a server. The running program is stored in a EEPROM in the CPU slot and is updated every time we make a program change, and that is quite often. We don't have the luxury of shutting down our operation to add equipment on a routine basis. That is what makes the industrial controllers pretty much bullet proof. I've been here for 30 years and I have never seen an instance where a PLC failed and shut us down, or loosing a portion of memory that caused a shutdown.
 
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#6
Automotive temperature range is -40 to 125*C, what's yours? Room temperature is common. Marketing learned really no difference between a military IC opposed to a consumer grade, the difference is that military grade is tested to military specification, but cost more to run these test. Let's just save a few cents, take the risk and purchase consumer grade, its range is from 0-70*C.

Feeling lucky?
 
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#7
That is an an excellent point. We tried to buy SCR's for a GE DC drive from another source. They wouldn't hold up longer than a month or 2. GE told us they would check the performance of each SCR to be sure they met their specifications. The alternate source was a lot cheaper, but it wasn't worth the extra downtime. We used mil spec switches to operate the bucket rotators on the log loaders because they were guaranteed 1,000,000 cycles. The original switches would fail after about a month of operation. So yes, you make a good point.
 
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#8
Another common problem is lack of a good power on reset, program counters in a microcontroller have to be set to zero so they start reading code from the beginning. Most vehicles are still using the original 7805 voltage regulator developed my Motorola back in around 1970, a linear, that requires at least 8.5 volts to output 5 volts, if that voltage is even 0.2 volts low, the microcontroller won't reset, a small capacitor had to hold the reset pin low with Vss at 5 volts or won't reset.

12 volt battery is very close to 8.5 volts, and can really drop with a starter load, Fords with that positive engagement starter have a peak load of 1,200 amperes, slightest amount of resistance can drop this voltage.

Do have switchmode voltage regulators now that can even output 5 volts if the input even drops below this level and have no idea why kid engineers are not using this. Could write self correcting code, but being rushed to meet market deadlines, don't even have enough time to write code right in the first place.

Motorola was the best back then, but quit the semiconductor business a long time ago. Did completely invent the entire cell phone system, towers, compressed scrambled code, phones and all of this, but not doing very well today, but sure made Apple rich. Ha, should have purchased stock ten years ago, but my crystal ball has a crack in it.
 
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#9
Thanks for the explanation of the reset in the PCM. I had no idea how the internals work in this equipment. One of the things I hate as a tech is having to deal with a "black box". Unfortunately, this is going to be the wave of the future.
 
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#10
Can go way back to my then father-in-law 86 Chrysler New Yorker, one year warranty, electronic dash went out, dealer replaced it. After 12K miles warranty was gone, drove a lot, about six months, dash went out again, dealer wanted 600 bucks. He drove up 300 miles with a black screen to let me look at it. Pulled the ignition switch and took it apart, contact for the dash lacked tension with a tiny point. Flattened that and polished it to a mirror finish. Wan't getting a POR, after about an hour, his dash was working again.