Garage door opener

billr

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#1
Well, it's not exactly an automotive topic, but a garage door that won't open and close reliably sure can impact "driveablity"! Is anybody here pretty familiar with the controller electronics, or know of a forum that specializes in garage door problems? I have one with the controller PC board going bad and am going to need schematics, at least.
 
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#2
I am sure you may have tried this- search the brand, then see if online support,
 

billr

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#3
No, actually I haven't tried that yet. Occasionally one of the big torsion springs will break and trying to get help from the manufacturer or local dealer was useless; but the door itself and the opener are made by different folks, so maybe I'll do better this time. Thanks for pointing out "the obvious", we can all overlook the easy way at times!
 

billr

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#4
Wow, I can't believe we put up with these flaky door openers for seven years! Since my first posting a second opener went out, but we just put up with it. I determined that the opener themselves weren't bad, but the floor-level safety sensors were. Those type devices are common at HD or Lowes ($60), but my particular manufacturer changed the design, so the ones available now won't work; and in-kind replacements are not-to-be had. I was kindly advised to just replace the whole opener assembly. I got pissed-off enough that I just gave up back then.

A few years later, probably about the time the second one died, I got out a scope and figured out what wave-form the opener was expecting from the sensor; then did a breadboard of a small circuit to simulate the sensor. Then put it aside until recently...

So, I finally got around to making three little boards (one for the third door, its sensor is bound to fail too eventually). So far it is working fine. It amounts to just an LM555 timer and a couple of caps, resistors, and a diode. Probably $5-10 in components. So, that is the "take away" for anybody stumbling upon this thread in the future: where there is a will, there is a way! It can be done.

PS: these are Chamberlain "Lift-Master" openers
 
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#6
I have to agree with nickb2. Bill- you tackle things nobody else would even consider. More power to you.

Guys on this site probably do not know that you even MADE a piston ring for a motorcycle out of a piece of pipe with heat treating etc. , then gave it to my Grandson and it is still running years later. Great mind. Have a happy 2019.
 

grcauto

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#7
I have to agree with nickb2. Bill- you tackle things nobody else would even consider. More power to you.

Guys on this site probably do not know that you even MADE a piston ring for a motorcycle out of a piece of pipe with heat treating etc. , then gave it to my Grandson and it is still running years later. Great mind. Have a happy 2019.
Bill, you and I we're cut from a cloth of another era. An era where we cut our teeth on fabrication......Why buy that when with a little heat and a bit of metallurgy understanding you can make it out of scrap? Why buy a board or module when you have the skills to produce your own? I'm taking care of our church bus and I had the schematic (see attached) for the module, so called, that controls the front doors. They wanted $190 for this stinking module that uses 2 relays and a simple current limiter. When I called about the module, if they want to call it that, the guy told me the price and I said.....WHAT?.....He said we give you a one year warranty on the module. I told him I would make my own MODULE and it will out last the bus. He said.....How you gonna do that?.....I said, you sent me the diagrams for this bus. If you want to sell me that module for that kind of money you shouldn't have made that information available, although reverse engineering is fun. I went and got a couple 30 Amp relays and made a current sensing circuit using a darlington transistor and it'll last for 20 years.
We are old but we were schooled the right way. We learned to build......not be parts swappers ....... We used anything and everything to get the job done and done right. We are old school, we learned to fix just about anything using just about anything.
 

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#8
Changed many of those over the years! Simple mechanical linkage to open a door then have to engineer a nightmare to open it with a switch! Ridiculousness!!! And that is a simple system to some of the nightmares I had to work on with busses!!