Honda 1.7L

GMC guy

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#1
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Honda
Civic
2004
200k
1.7L

I am looking for the correct torque specs for standard tranny. Flywheel to engine and clutch to flywheel torque in foot pounds. Thank you
 

nickb2

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#3
I also usually just use a breaker bar to block the crank from moving at front of engine on balancer. Should be 19mm and just let the breaker bar rest under the car. I once used a pry bar to block the flywheel and broke a tooth. Was not my brightest idea. Luckily, the local wrecking yard had one already dismantled. No big deal, but blocked my lift for a few hours waiting on it. But that was for a mazda wenkle engine and that big nut is 400some odd ft pounds. :eek: I say luckily because those flywheels are rare to come by. Needed a truck torque wrench to go that high. I probably could have left it there with only one tooth missing, but didn't want to take the risk. Mazda wanted something like 500$ or so and was back order and that was alot of money back in 1998 or 99. But that was many years ago. Never had to do another one since.

Anyway, sitting on a couch is the only way to not makes mistakes. And don't forget to lubricate the pilot bearing with a light coat regular oil and grease the pivot points for the clutch fork. Lithium grease is best. A tube of this stuff or similar goes a long way for cheap.

https://www.amazon.ca/Lucas-Oil-10533-Lithium-Grease/dp/B004X70LZA

Honda recommends a super high temp urea grease, but I don't think that is necessary and that stuff is hard to find, lithium grease has a working range of -29c to +140c or so. So is perfectly fine for the fork contact points and clutch disk splines on input shaft and throw out bearing.

So with that being said, you probably knew that already, but alot of ppl read these kind of threads and this sort of info may help others.

happy wrenching and happy holidays.
 
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nickb2

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#4
Oh, forgot to mention, for those that may want to use an impact gun on those flywheel bolts, not recommended. They are easy to strip being twelve point contact. Once you strip one of those, you in for a hell of a time. ;) Same goes for the clutch plate to flywheel bolts but a pair of vise grips can save the day since they are not high torque. I say this because I have seen this done before.
 

billr

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#5
Besides, I think "correct torque" and "impact gun" are mutually-exclusive...
 

nickb2

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#7
Of course I meant for teardown. I just find that these twelve point fasteners for the flywheel don't like a power tool being that they are flatter than most and a twelve point socket tends to want to jump with the impact action. It's just a precaution I have become to use with this type of fastener. Same applies for twelve point bolts and nuts on some wheel bearing applications. Way to easy to WANT to use an impact, but those will strip in New York minute. A breaker bar is best. Just sayin'.
 

jd

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#8
I've seen where a socket is ground down at the open end, so the chamfer is removed, allowing the flutes to contact the fastener all the way down. There's a horror story around here somepace, where an "oil store tecch" stripped the drain plug and was using an impact wrench to try and get it "tighter."