No climate control!!

gfbidd

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#1
Make
ford
Model
f350 xlt
Year
2006
Miles
about 230,000 km
Engine
6.0
My climate control quit! Not just the display but the heat controls as well, no heat, no fan, nothing! Did it once before but cycled ignition on and off and it came back. Checked all fuses, removed dash and checked wires and connections. New from dealer is $760 and a week away and jobber is $450. Any ideas before I spend the $$
 
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#2
If recycling the ignition switch got it going, sounds like a lack of power on reset problems, when the starter is hit, battery voltage has to be greater than 8.5 volts. Can be a dirty ignition switch, ground or battery problem connectivity problems or even the battery itself, internal resistance increases with age.

Been a problem ever since computers were added to our vehicles, program counter in the microcontroller has to be reset to zero to read code from the beginning. Ha, on my old 89 Continental, radio wound not work, electronic suspension would go nuts, pulled the ignition switch and polished the contacts to a mirror finish, new battery, and also had to clean ground terminals, all corroded. Alternator needs a good ground, depends on aluminum to aluminum contact that get corroded, added my own ground to it.
 

gfbidd

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#4
Forgot to mention, I do have battery and ignition power to control panel!
 
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#5
Do you have a voltmeter, scheme is to test for voltage drops, ha, still have a Balentine that cost $3,500.00 in 1968, can pick up a decent one today for around ten bucks.

Voltage equals current times resistance and for all practical reasons, resistance should be close to zero home, current can be obtained by switching on a load, headlamps around 15 amperes, rear window defroster 25 amps, same as switching on the blower motor, but you can't do this with yours.

Reference point is the negative terminal of the battery, by connecting on lead directly to the post, with a load should read close to zero volts, 0.1-0.3 volts is typical.

With problems in my 2012 Cruze, negative lead to the battery, positive lead to any ground point, with the rear defrosters turn on measured 2.3 volts, this is 2.3 volts less to all the vehicles electronic. Need a digital scope to measure the voltage when hitting the starter, but not necessary, but did drop to about six volts. Problem was they crimped the negative battery terminal to bare copper wire, was all corroded inside. Rather buy a new one, I soldered it in.

In like manner, the positive voltage is the positive terminal of the battery terminal. Can go way back to my father-in-laws 86 Chrysler, dealer told him after his one year warranty was up, needed a new electronic dash for 600 bucks. While his ignition switch had 12.6 V applied the feed to his electronic dash was only like 9 volts, it was dropping 3.6 volts. Pulled the switch and buffered the bare copper terminal to a mirror finish for close to a zero voltage drop, his electronic dash worked good after this.

Could have purchased a new switch, but would only last as long as the first one, finish on that switch was terrible, then he would have a different key.

This is an age old problem and really noticeable when computers were installed. Can find corroded fuse connectors. First law in electrical connections is to never connect dissimilar metals, this law is broken a zillion times.

One other example was on my 89 Continental, electronic suspension went crazy, dealer said average cost to repair it was $3,000.00, another bare copper contact switch, this one was using tamper proof torx screws, purchased a complete set of these. But not the only problem, in all the connectors use insulation displacement terminals. What a job this was, bean counter should be shot, saves stripping the insulation off first. Just used a utility knife to cut off the insulation near the connector and soldered them, problem solved. Ground for the fuel pump was under the front seat, all rusty. Could write a book about this, thing I just did.
 

gfbidd

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#6
Working fine now, I just had to replace the alternator, so maybe the low voltage caused a glitch. Fingers crossed that it stays fixed, thanx for all your help!!
 

nickb2

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#7
@gfbidd , I just found a new toy for my sister. A lexus is250 awd. That thing is a monster when it comes to electrical. Some idiot reverse jumped the car. Blew out a whole bunch of the electric. That's how I got the car so cheap for her.

Anyway, long story short, power windows would not work any more. I proceed to check wiring since at each door, the windows worked. After checking all the wiring, I call for a master switch. While I am waiting on the switch, I do a quick google search. All it needed was a master switch relearn position for each switch. Amazing what you can do with a google search. The old guy's at the shop always laugh and call me the laptop guy. I always have a scanner bluetooth thing in my hands. I literally make a living and a good one at that just by working on the technical side of this trade.

Presto, master switch is fine. Mux line gateway code went away etc. Same thing for the AC head unit in this car. After that reverse jump error, this lexus was a mess. Radio gone, ac gone etc. Sadly for the radio, it is the amplifier in the trunk that got the brunt of the massive voltage, blew the two out puts in the amp. So after one 200$ main fuse bar, 8 other fuses later, all circuits were now integral, but almost everything on a lexus like this needed a re-calibration of some sorts. Since I am a generalist, I was not aware that the power windows stop functioning after a power down, battery swap, or in this case, some idiot that can't tell the difference between - and +.

So I am not surprised that a voltage drop caused a glitch in your climate control head unit. NickD is very wise in what he writes here.

I am just happy you don't have to spend a weeks pay for something actually is fine.

:D
 
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#8
Retired for eight years now, use to say jumper cables were our best friend for aftermarket sales. A short circuited battery can output as much as 2,500 amperes that can really do a lot of damage. Maintenance free batteries is a marketing term, capless is more accurate, was lawsuits with caps, if removed, a careless person would get splashed with acid. Electrolyte still gets low exposing the top of the plates that short circuits them, bit safer, but also throwaway.

Ha, if you paid for a new MVAC system would still have the same problem. One of my kids was told they wanted $4,000.00 for a new AT, only problem with it was the contacts in what use to be the neutral safety switch, all kind of strange names now, were dirty.