Opinions on drilled and slotted rotors

big al

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#1
Make
Chevrolet
Model
Impala lt
Year
2013
Miles
86,000
Engine
3.6
My personal car (2013 Impala) has been plaqued with brake shutter for 3 rotor working now. History = purchased with 36000 miles, rotors shook on test drive, dealer (turned) all 4 rotors and replaced all pads with oe ceramic. Little over 1.5 years and shaking again. Soooo, i normally dont even recommend turning them anymore to customers. I bought all 4 and new oe pads again-problem gone. About another 1.5 years problem back. This time i bought all 4 but used raybestos instead of a/c delco. Now 1-2years later and shaking again, soooooo this time im trying the drilled and slotted rotors. Now, im not nessessarily thinking the rotors have major warpge so much as im getting material transfer to disk causing shudder. Im not hard on the car or the brakes by any means. Im not expecting to feel any difference at all, but wondering if these rotors help with material transfer by keeping temps on disk and pads down. BTW all rotors (a/c delco and others have been g3000 and pads have been bedded properly. No premature wear on any pads. Anyone ever tried these drilled and slotted rotors??
 

jd

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#2
Can you find out what the Police use with their Impalas?
 

big al

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#3
Best i can see is that the police/taxi uses a 12.7 diameter while mine uses 11.9 (most common), both use blank rotors from factory with aftermarket drilled and slotted as optional. I could change over but shouldnt have to.
 

jd

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#4
Not hard mechanically to do some brake upgrades but gotta have all the little pieces. It's OK if you have access to a complete donor car. I did a Pontiac and a Dodge that way. Third was our Ford E450 RV and it was the easiest. All brand new parts from a 4x2 being upgraded to 4x4.
 

big al

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#5
I agree, i could change it to the larger size but should not need to. With as many Impalas on the road as there is i know they havent all switched over. I have seen other impalas with drilled and slotted rotors but never questioned the owners about it, who knows
 
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#7
I would advise to try rotors that are not "OEM technological marvels". Perhaps the "extra manufacturing step" helps unsold cars, but causes problems later as the rotor wears a little.
 

big al

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#8
Kev2, ahh i have heard of this but totally skipped my mind, thanks. Mobile Dan, i think your on to something here, that would explain alot. The drilled and slotted rotors hopefully can help with that problem. Ive had customers ask about the rust on rotors and how to prevent it. I normally will offer to coat them with a high temp automotive clear (similar to what goes on the paint)( must stay away from and clean pad surface after coating ) it will normally keep the rotors looking really good for a few years. I dont think the drilled or slotted combination rotors have the extra process the factory uses. Maybe ill just try my clear trick
 

big al

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#9
That would explain why the dealer was so willing to fix it no charge with (turning/refinishing) the rotors and new pads. And probly why the replacement a/c delco replacements did the same thing.
 

nickb2

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#10
This stuff works wonders also. http://www.kleenflo.com/products/333.html This stuff for some reason really works. On some molecular level they say on the can, but I have seen advantages and less transfer of material in the initial break in period.

I work on police package/interceptors many times a week, sometimes, many times a day. They all use Oem. Some have drilled rotors, usually, we don't install the drilled ones back on. It's a waste of time as these cops beat the shyte out of their cars and don't care.

I personally never have seen a benefit come from the drilled rotors for normal street cars such as yours, and the idiots that install them on their 1990 honda civics or similar, with stock everything expect the big flashy rims are going to get no benefit from them at all.

I find the drilled rotors get blasted from heat faster and crack between the drill holes, which in fact makes the rotors rust through way faster than your regular plain vented ones. The slotted ones fair better in the cracking dept, but no benefit there also in performance unless your track driving, but they do tend to make less noise as they vent braking residue gassing better. However, when the pads are properly vented and slotted, no need for slotted disks also.

When I do a brake job and some guy makes me install cheap stuff, I usually go the extra mile to chamfer and slott the pads myself. That way, I know the job may have some some slim chance in hell of not making any noise while he cooks the shyte of the pads in the first few braking periods.
 

nickb2

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#15
Next reason why I don't recommend slotted for street applications, I have noticed clients doing less mileage with slotted rotors as they seem to eat up the pads faster.

I am probably beating a dead dog by now, but really, just using premium brake pads with vented slots will suffice and regular old run of the mill rotors is best for street.

Here is an example of what I do to a crap brake pad to make it better. Notice these are premium pads. So they come slotted and coated out of the box. You will see they use the brake in coating I talked about earlier in this thread. Has chamfer and a slot to vent brakes gasses and also allow for material to get in there instead of contaminating the actual pad itself prevent shudder.

Normally, I always tell a client to use premium pads and cheap out on rotors if they are on a budget. But if they really want to cheap out, well, it only takes me 5 minutes to do the rest myself, but that cheap pad usually ends up biting them in the arse later on and especially if they have nice mags, I kind of like it when I see them back at the shop with the rims full of dust and rust powder. Make me happy to tell them that next time, maybe they won't chinse out on what is supposed to be the safest part of your car apart from tires.

You can put crappy oil in your engine tranny etc, you can put crappy 4$ spark plugs for all I care, but never chinse out on brakes and tires.

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