Question about brake calipers

Boomer

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#31
Even though you installed new metal slides, you may want to take a close look how they mount on the caliber bracket. This bracket is made of steel and subject to corrosion. Check under the new metal slides for corrosion build up on the caliber bracket. That basically decreases the distance between the top and the bottom of the caliber slides. Too much corrosion may cause the pads to bind in the new slides because there is not enough clearance.
Good luck
Yep, that’s good advice. I did try to clean up under there a bit.
 

Boomer

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#32
To clarify...use a rod to push down pedal 1 inch AND HOLD IT AT THAT POSITION while the hose is not attached to a caliper.

Don't worry about the fact that a tiny amount of fluid will be forced into the caliber when you push the pedal down 1 inch. The piston will "move out" a fraction of an inch, it doesn't matter. You haven't removed the hose yet, at that point.
Gotcha. I’m happy to hear anything that keeps the mess down and/or makes the job easier
 

©hester

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#33
One other thing you can look at is the pad itself. More specifically, the steel backing plate. Looking closely at the edge. About half the thickness is a smooth cut through the plate. The other half has a rough edge. When steel is sheared or stamped, the cutting edge starts a cut, the steel breaks. All that being said, the distance measured across the width is different depending on which side is measured. The broke edge side width will be slightly wider than the cut side edge.
I have in the past, had the grind the edge steel so there is a little more clearance for the pads to retract. Once you look at the edge it should all make sense.
 

©hester

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#34
...and by the way, caliburs aren't that expensive. The parts store will want the old ones back.

Good luck,
 
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#35
Trim- to-fit is such a timesaver that I made this grinder attachment to fit a 1/2" cordless impact gun. I later added a guard to protect the grinder disc (and my fingers).
1541172519920.jpg 1541172519920.jpg
 

grcauto

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#36
We use a high speed wire wheel to clean them up REAL good. They will usually last between changes provided they are being used 15K a year. Some areas in the salt belt it's good idea to clean them every two years. If you don't get all that rust out they will stick and the pads will wear funny and they can become a real pain if they get to bad.
 
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#37
One other thing you can look at is the pad itself. More specifically, the steel backing plate. Looking closely at the edge. About half the thickness is a smooth cut through the plate. The other half has a rough edge. When steel is sheared or stamped, the cutting edge starts a cut, the steel breaks. All that being said, the distance measured across the width is different depending on which side is measured. The broke edge side width will be slightly wider than the cut side edge.
That is what I was trying to say in post #5, BUT YOU STATED IT BETTER.

" I experienced a similar situation recently and in my case the brake pad metal backing was just enough oversized (maybe a few thousands of an inch) and was dragging on the caliper solid housing so that it would not retract enough. Taking off a few thousands of an inch on the pad backing solved that. "
 

©hester

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#38
I have cut heavy gauge steel and be within tolerance on the cut edge and be out of tolerance on the broke edge. The thicker the steel, the greater the difference.

Happy Friday
 

©hester

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#39
That is what I was trying to say in post #5, BUT YOU STATED IT BETTER.

" I experienced a similar situation recently and in my case the brake pad metal backing was just enough oversized (maybe a few thousands of an inch) and was dragging on the caliper solid housing so that it would not retract enough. Taking off a few thousands of an inch on the pad backing solved that. "
Sorry Jack. I didn't mean to trump your post.
 

Boomer

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#40
Well I put the new one on. I see now how well the guide pins move. My test drive seemed ok. I ended up gluing the backing plate back on because the pedal was going down too far. The caliper still easily slid over and on. I think they may have boxed the part wrong because the bleeder screw was on the opposite side as the old one. It was however identical to the driver side.

That was the only difference I could see though. Since the part had to be ordered, I went ahead and put it on. It seems work fine and, as I said, that's the only difference I could see and I looked pretty thoroughly.
 
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#41
You said "the bleeder screw was on the opposite side as the old one".

Well. that's weird...location of the bleeder needs to be at the highest point of the fluid cavity when bleeding is performed so the all the air comes out.
A "gotta made this caliper work" trick would be to flip the (unbolted) caliper around so that the bleeder was at top, bleed it, then install it.
 

Boomer

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#42
You said "the bleeder screw was on the opposite side as the old one".

Well. that's weird...location of the bleeder needs to be at the highest point of the fluid cavity when bleeding is performed so the all the air comes out.
A "gotta made this caliper work" trick would be to flip the (unbolted) caliper around so that the bleeder was at top, bleed it, then install it.
Ahh man, Dan. I never thought of that. I can't flip it around. I guess I'm going to have to go back to the parts guy and have him order the other one. I'll have to have him make sure he doesn't get another one just like it. Thanks for keeping me straight.

I must say though. I didn't see any bubbles in the fluid whatsoever. That said, I should still get the correct one.

EDIT: I just got off the phone with the parts guy. He double checked and it was his mistake. He said for some reason he thought I needed the drivers side. He's going to get me the correct one. I can still drive the truck in the meantime and I'm on vacation this week so, it isn't as big of a deal as it could be. Thanks again
 
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#43
Ahh man, Dan. I never thought of that. I can't flip it around. I guess I'm going to have to go back to the parts guy and have him order the other one. I'll have to have him make sure he doesn't get another one just like it. Thanks for keeping me straight.

I must say though. I didn't see any bubbles in the fluid whatsoever. That said, I should still get the correct one.

EDIT: I just got off the phone with the parts guy. He double checked and it was his mistake. He said for some reason he thought I needed the drivers side. He's going to get me the correct one. I can still drive the truck in the meantime and I'm on vacation this week so, it isn't as big of a deal as it could be. Thanks again
Ok. I got the right part from the store. I installed it. Bled the brakes and, test drove it. All seems great now. I've now learned about these guide pins. Thanks for the tips and lessons here. The mess was indeed not really a mess at all by pushing the pedal down an inch when removing the brake line. I feel confident saying this is now :fixed: