Replacing Ignition Lock without key?!

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#1
Hello, I have a 1978 Mustang. I lost the keys and have a new replacement ignition lock. I have the shop manual, but it says i need to turn the lock to the "On" position to take the old lock out. Problem is i dont have the key to do that? ??? there has to be a way to replace it without the key? Please help. I tried calling ford to have them cut me a new key, but they told me it is too old. Locksmith was too expensive so i figured i would replace the the whol lock.
 
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#2
Hey Robby,
Have you checked with the dealer ? Long shot, but maybe they can help you with the key.
I only can get my hands on a manual from 79, but here is goes:

Non-Functioning Lock Cylinder
NOTE: The following procedure applies to vehicles in which the ignition lock is inoperative and the lock cylinder cannot be rotated due to a lost or broken ignition key, unknown key number, or lock cylinder cap which is damaged and/or broken.


Disconnect the negative battery cable.
Remove the steering wheel, as described earlier in this section.
On tilt columns, remove the upper extension shroud by unsnapping the shroud from the retaining clip at the 9 o'clock position.
Remove the steering column trim shrouds.
Disconnect the wiring at the key warning switch.
Using a 1⁄8 in. (3mm) drill bit, mounted in a right angle drive drill adapter, drill out the retaining pin, going no deeper than 1⁄2 in. (12.7mm).
Tilt the column to the full down position. Place a chisel at the base of the ignition lock cylinder cap and, using a hammer, break away the cap from the lock cylinder.
Using a 3⁄8 in. (10mm) drill bit, drill down the center of the ignition lock cylinder key slot about 1 3⁄4 in. (44mm), until the lock cylinder breaks loose from the steering column cover casting.
Remove the lock cylinder and the drill shavings from the housing.
Remove the upper bearing snapring washer and steering column lock gear.
Carefully inspect the steering column housing for signs of damage from the previous operation. If any damage is apparent, the components should be replaced.
To install:

Install the ignition lock drive gear.
Install the ignition lock cylinder.
Install the shift lever detent plate that was retained from the housing with the damaged lock cylinder (column shift only). Install the new lock cylinder housing.
Adjust the ignition switch retained from the housing with the damaged lock cylinder, and install it onto the new lock cylinder housing.
Install the new lock cylinder housing assembly.
Install the shift cane assembly (column shift only) and upper bearing.
Install the steering column trim shroud.
Check for proper starting action in PARK or NEUTRAL. Also check that the start circuit cannot be actuated in the DRIVE and REVERSE positions, and that the column is locked in the LOCK position.
Install the steering wheel.
Connect the negative battery cable.

Might be able to get you some pictures, look in to it tomorrow.
Ford_Dude
 
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#3
I have tried having the dealership cut me a new key, but they told me the car was too old. Hopefully your directions will help. Even though 78 was the year before the fox body mustangs :-\ . Ok, now about the drilling part. When you tell me to drill out the retaining pin with a 3mm bit. Did you mean the Lock cylinder hole? (what my shop manual tells me) Its the pin sized hole where you put a wire pin to release the cylinder. Heh, I just dont want to start drilling without making sure. :eek: thanks!
 
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#4


Hope this helps. I have never done one of these without a key.

Good Luck,
Ford_Dude
 

autodr

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#5
Robby93 said:
I have tried having the dealership cut me a new key, but they told me the car was too old. Hopefully your directions will help. Even though 78 was the year before the fox body mustangs :-\ . Ok, now about the drilling part. When you tell me to drill out the retaining pin with a 3mm bit. Did you mean the Lock cylinder hole? (what my shop manual tells me) Its the pin sized hole where you put a wire pin to release the cylinder. Heh, I just dont want to start drilling without making sure. :eek: thanks!
Key codes are only stored on http://fmcdealer.com/ back to about '97 (that's were the dealer gets key codes by VIN#, among all other Ford vehicle information). Any older that and it is hit or miss. Before that, the key codes were only stored on file at the original selling dealer in a hard file. Probably long thrown out with that age. Drill it. Use a high quality drill bit like a cobalt bit and a steady hand... YEs, the pin that you would push in after rotating the cylinder with the key, drill ONLY the pin.
 

infj23

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#6
$.02
Or, if you can get someone (like a locksmith) to pick the lock to the "on" position, you'll be able to remove the cylinder the easy way (by depressing the pin while the cylinder is turned).

Hope that helps. Sounds better than drilling to me!

David King
 
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NickD

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#7
My locksmith can get into anything quicker than I can with a key, so much for feeling secure with all these locks. Only charges me a couple of bucks if I can bring something to his shop, but have to expect to pay around 50 bucks if you expect him to drive out to your home. Most locks are stamped with a number, with that number and his notebook, can bang out any kind of key. My AAA covers loss of a vehicle key.

Dang I feel like an idiot, lost a small leather key holder with my DeVille and Supra keys in it, looked all over and did a lot of house cleaning, have spares, but was concerned about my house and garage keys also in that packet. Ironically, my wife was folding my blue jeans and she finds the keys jammed in my change pocket, and those jeans went through the washing machine about a dozen times and never fell out.

Did you check your change pocket?
 
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#8
hello i am new to this site and came across this thread. i see that it is old but i am curious as to how the drilling went???
i would say that it did damage to the housing, but that is just a guess, i have never done one like that before
myself i would have suggested you take the column out and take it to a locksmith that would be you're cheapest way out of that
pickle.
ford igns have two active retainers, the face of a ford pin tumbler ign has high carbon steel to prevent drilling attacks.
they are quite formidable to the layman.

sorry i could not help, hope it went well
 

Transman

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#9
My locksmith comes out vary inexpensively also, he has a toll that he fishes around the outside of the bezel and depresses, like 2 seconds, the lock assy pops out, no steering wheel off or anything. Check around for a good locksmith. It's worth the price for the damage you can do by drilling in the wrong place. I have better places to spend my labor, so it's worth it to me for even 75 bucks and 10 minutes it is totally done. just my $.02, Transman
 
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#10
I realize this is not a fresh thread, but my reply may be of help to many others.


Beware of off-brand replacement locks. Not all are poor quality, you just never know what you are getting.


Locksmiths are aware of which locks from which manufacturers are a problem, and can select an alternative that does not have the problems.

For Example: Ford Focus. We had a BETTER lock early on in the history of that disaster. The OE and most AFTERMARKET were all the same. Only STRATTEC had an alternative that was free of trouble.

One might not WANT to pay a locksmith, but a good one will be WORTH the price. Many locksmiths such as myself have walk-in shops, so you have the option to save the trip charge if you can bring the problem in.
 

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#11
I would pull the door lock cylinder and take it to a locksmith. A copy of the original key could easily and cheaply be made.
 

autodr

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#12
Locksmitherie said:
For Example: Ford Focus. We had a BETTER lock early on in the history of that disaster. The OE and most AFTERMARKET were all the same. Only STRATTEC had an alternative that was free of trouble.
What??? Naaaahhh... those Focuses have the best cylinders in the business... they all break to where the un-enlightened can't make them turn and bring it in to fix it. Plenty of good turns left in them.... just gotta know how to sweet talk them into turning. Then they come right out for replacement nice and easy.... and that is hands down Ford's easiest lock cylinder to build.... those are GREAT! ;D
 
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#13
Best way is an ounce of prevention, when getting a new or used vehicle, besides the two sets, have a spare set made and drop those in a Mason jar. At my locksmith, with that penny resistor added to the key for my Caddy, that key cost $12.00, but others are a buck. Charges a quarter more than the local hardware store, but they work.

Don't ask me how my daughter locked in both set of keys in her car, but she did, but dad had a spare key hidden away.