Uneven Pad Wear Rear Discs

nickb2

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#16
@jd, yes they do. Here is a snapshot of your sisters rear end. Yikes, that sounded better in my head than in writing. I swear, I have never seen your sisters rear end. :eek: Notice "E"
Screenshot (221).png
 

nickb2

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#17
Again @ Jd, I posted for 2006 accord, but I doubled checked, 2005 is same picture.

So looks like you may want to make sure those are lined up if you think you overlooked that.
 

big al

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#18
Yes honda has them too. Alot of manufactures went to that. Cheaper to form the tits in the mold than it is to make another mold for the finger clips and rivet to put it on the pad. Hmmmm anything to save a penny. Hope he checked the fusion out, and yes take that honda apart before its too late.
 

PC

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#19
Thanks for the advice. It's been raining here every other day it seems. I'm positive those tits were lined up on the pads, plus it was the original from the factory pads that went out first. The pins were free and were cleaned and lubed.

Some say it's the parking brake, but I can't figure out how it operates. I had a helper operate the parking brake and it operates freely. Could that goofy parking brake mechanism keep the caliper from sliding and releasing pressure on the outboard pad?

That caliper doesn't have that preloader clip on the pads, rather some cheesy clips on the ends of the pads. I hate this rebuilt stuff, sometimes it's worse than what came off. Unfortunately everything now is disposable.
This new stuff is just garbage, still have original GM single piston calipers on an almost 50 year old vehicle that still work perfectly.
 
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#20
Sure love my 88 Supra, conventional calipers inherently self adjustable just like the front, but have integrated shoe brakes for parking, really hold tight.

One key problem with calipers are the seals, as the pad wears, stick out further, and with this darn road salt, pistons get corroded. While you may have 1,500 psi to push them in, only about 5 psi to pull them back in. Long time ago, I remove the seals, replace them with new but put a bead of silicon grease around the piston, this helps keep out road salt.

Rarely use a C-clamp, just loosen the bleeder, if my two thumbs can push the piston back in, time for more cleaning.

Three of my Chevy dealers are really dumb, none of them new the rear disc calipers are adjusted by working the parking brake. On my kid's Soul, parking brake cable was adjusted so tight, the levers could not go to the home position, so working the parking brake did not work, not to mention the brake drag.

Many new vehicles are using torque plates or pad holders, these can be removed, pads spread, so you can slide them off. Before these, with an edge around the rotor, could not slide them off, so that edge had to be ground off. Also have to screw in the pistons, changing the tool for this every five minutes.

Typical GM rear disc, could not screw those in all, road salt would leak in through that grommet by the lever, and that screw would be rusted tight. One key reason preferred drum brakes. For my 78 Fleetwood, new rear disc calipers were 300 bucks each and only available from the dealer. Price is coming down closer to the hundred buck range. Only account for about 20% of the braking anyway.

Caliper guide pins get silicone, load the inside of the boots with this, helps keep out road salt. Everything else gets anti-seize, that black brake grease is only good for a month or so. With torque plates, have metal clips on them road salt gets trapped to bind the pads, gets a good coating of anti-seize.

Getting difficult to find pad with plated backing plates, most are painted, chips off with rust where they meet the clips, another area for anti-seize, but with this damned road salt, a spring job every year. Rotors are held on with flat screw, that sure gets anti-seize, as does the hub where the tire fits on, cast iron, with rust, can't even remove a tire.
 
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#21
Combined caliper service/parking brakes work just like a ratchet wrench, if you don't back it far enough to get that click into the next tooth moving it forward nothing happens.

If applying the parking brake to compress the pads, if there is insufficient clearance, won't ratchet to the next tooth, so nothing happens. but if there is clearance, then it will ratchet, even several times with the parking brake. Always screw in that piston an extra turn to make sure the parking brake takes up that play. Can do this stopped, engine off. You will feel the service brake pedal come up, but leave your foot off of it while working the parking brake.

Also set my shoes loose as well, this time roll backwards and tap on the brake or slowly in reverse, brake pedal will be low, but build up to a full pedal, if the self adjusters are working properly.

Last kid, she's gone now was talked into replacing her front pads by a shop for only 99 bucks, swore they put those in with a sledge hammer. Took a large pry bar to remove them. Have to be cleaned and lubricated and installed easily with your fingers. Her rotors were red hot. Simple test, spin the wheel, should be a slight drag, step on the brakes, and should be just as easy to spin it. Yet, another problem are rubber brake hoses from China, poor job of vulcanizing, inner layer acts like a check valve.

Another bad joke is our stupid congress making ABS law, pure crap with a three inch cube, only pulse once per second, good ones would pulse ten times per second. ABS pump is cheap brush type motor. When optional, huge ABS pump, could also activate the pump by closing the ABS pump relay, with this new crap, need a scanner. And shop manuals say to use the sparingly, you may burn up that piece of crap motor.

Want over 500 bucks for this POS.
 

PC

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#22
Back to the Fusion. Had pads and rotors all ready to install. Cleaned and greased the sliders, turned in the piston, lined up the tit, but the caliper would not slide over the disc. Piston wasn't in far enough and won't go any more. Should that piston be nearly flush with the caliper? I've done GMs and the piston turns in nearly flush with the face of the caliper. This one doesn't turn in that far, it is sticking out a bit and won't turn in anymore. I'm thinking these calipers are shit. Now I have to figure out how that parking brake attaches to the caliper. Any other suggestions?
 

PC

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#24
Thanks. I'm going to check the parking brake adjustment first, but that was never touched since new. I do know the primary operator NEVER uses the parking brake. Guess I'll have to investigate that area.