1966 Mustang parking brake

Davstur

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#1
I am trying to adjust the parking brake on a 1966 Ford Mustang. I have tried to tighten the equalizer rod as much as I can but the Pull handle cannot travel very much maybe about 2 inches and has no holding power. I loosened equalizer rod were the Pull Handle travels about 6 to 7 inches has little holding power will move in first and reverse gears. I pulled brake drums off and inspected park brake mechanism on rear wheels and it seem to have adequate move. I also readjusted self adjusting brake a little tighter. Does anyone know of any solutions to this problem. I need to take it in for an annual state inspection and a functioning parking brake is required.

Thanks DavStur
 

opelgt

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#2
Jack up the rear of the car, using jack stands for safety. Put transmission in Neutral and spin the rear wheels by hand. If you can spin them very easily, you may have to adjust the rear brakes more. You should be able to hear a slight "drag" noise from the brake shoes contacting the drums when spinning the wheels.
 

Davstur

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#3
Thanks; opelgt I did adjust them yesterday but I will try again to day and see if it will help.
 
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#4
You may already be aware of this, but parking brakes are not designed to be good enough to hold against the force of the engine. It's a "parking" brake, not an emergency brake. It may be normal.
 
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#5
Gee, its been 45 years since my then wife wanted a new Mustang, thought it was cute. Now I am trying to recall if that car has the left foot pedal for the parking brake or if it was on the console like all the newer vehicles with a hand pulled lever.

Think it was the hand level judging by the length of this cable.



Anyway, after the one year warranty was up, had to replace it, was as tight as a drum. How is yours, with it disconnected, does it move freely?

Proper adjustment with rear drum brakes is to make sure the service portion is adjusted properly, with both wheels off the ground and hand spun, sure hear and feel a slight drag. Then with the parking brake fully released, you tighten the cable until the wheels begin to lock, then loosen it just enough until they run free again. Judgment is confirmed by how many clicks you hear when you apply the parking brakes, around 3.

If all else is correct, your rear drums can be glazed, need them to be turned to clean them up, if still with tolerance.

See rockauto still has them for about 20 bucks each.



With these kind of prices, I just replace them.
 
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#6
one other note.before you adjust the rear brakes,back off the parking brake adjuster.after adjusting the rears,then adjust the parking brake.if you dont then only one shoe has good contact with the drum and will not hold worth a damn when the parking brake is applied.
 
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#7
On those old designs, the parking brakes become arthritic with age. The cable starts to sieze from hardened grease and corrosion. When it gets to that point I disconnect the parking brake cables at all the connections to bracket the problem. The arthritic cable gets removed, and exercised with liberal doses of lubricant, ideally silicone grease. If you don't get a lot of travel within the conduit, you'll have to feed it oil while exercising the cable to work it in.
 

Davstur

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#8
To all of you who tried to help I want to thank you for your responses. I tried every thing that was suggested but not much success. The brake hold a little better but I still do not feel comfortable parking on a steep incline. Maybe Ill be able to repair it better later.

Thanks all of you;
DavStur
 
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#9
Another point, when the parking brakes are applied, cable experiences tension causing compression on the cable housing. Never was pointed out if the cable in there is also 45 years old.

For less than 20 bucks for a new cable, is that old cable really worth fooling with for something as important as brakes? Could be compressing, never will adjust it correctly.

Yeah, I always add my own grease to even new cables, silicone is the best.