2000 Toyota Tundra brake line

Darren

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#1
Make
Toyota
Model
Tundra
Year
2000
Miles
200,000
Engine
4.7
I'm replacing a brake line on the rear from the tee to the wheel cylinder. Can I use a metric fitting on 3/16 tubing and flare for 3/16"? It looks like the flares on the factory tubing and the 3/16 are different.
 

grcauto

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#2
Depends on the flare. Bubble?
 

Darren

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#3
Both look like a 45 except the metric is a larger double flare. The metric die I have won't fit the 3/16 tubing ID.
 

grcauto

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#4
Go to the parts store and you can borrow or buy a flaring tool for under 20 bucks.
 
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#6
It looks like the flares on the factory tubing and the 3/16 are different.
If the difference is just "larger/smaller" it would probably still work. Using a drill bit to measure ID of both brake line and wheel cyl will give you an idea if there wil be a problem with matchup.
 

Darren

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#7
The fittings are metric. I removed the originals that came on the line and replaced them.
 

billr

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#8
I searched a bit for 5mm tubing suitable for this purpose, didn't find anything. All I saw was 316SS in "hard" condition. Too expensive and probably could not flare properly.

I suggest stretching the 3/16" tube open a bit so that the 5mm fittings and tools fit it better. Grip the tube OD in wood blocks clamped tight and force a pin into the ID to open the tube up a bit. You only need to do that for about 1", I think. When the pin is in there, or even as you progressively try to insert it, hammer lightly all over the tube OD. That hammering will help stretch the tube diameter.
 
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#9
Have a double flaring tool I purchase in the 60's and a bubble flaring tools I had to purchase in the 90's. Really stupid, another GM bean counter thing, double flare requires two operations, bubble only one, but bubbles really tend to leak if not perfect.

The double flaring tool is marked in fractions of an inch where the bubble is in metric. But the diameters of the tubing are exactly the same. 3/16" is 0.1875" but is marked on the bubble as 5 mm, not even close more like 4.75 mm. Our idiot congress did this back in the 80's because the Japanese would not buy our vehicles.

In the plant, we had to convert all of our prints from English to metric. The reason why the Japs wouldn't buy our vehicles is because they wanted the steering wheel on the right side and not on the left side.

Now what is metric is the hex fittings, had to purchase metric fitting wrenches, English would not work. cant use an opened end wrench would round off the hex. Worked on many Japanese cars, the tubing for the brake, gas, and transmission cooling lines were all English. Only have my 88 Supra left, uses all English tubing, but metric fittings.

Oh, and the Japanese put the steering wheel on the left hand side.

Also with real metric vehicles, all the sizes were even numbers, a millimeter is only 0.03937" too close together hard to tell the difference, never used odd sizes like 5, 7, 9. until I was working on domestic vehicles.
 

nickb2

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#10
I've got the Mastercool set. I don't need a flaring tool.
this on?https://www.mastercool.com/product/72485-universal-hydraulic-flaring-tool-set/

, cuz if you do, I love it. We bought this kit a few months ago cuz an aprentice basically f'd off wit Both flaring kitso_O. Guess he had a better side line than working with us, and also chose to steal other choice items from our boxes. I saw him hitch hiking the ohter day, was tempted to pull over REAL quick. If you know what I mean.

My better judgement left him on the side of the road soaking. F u a hole. Steal my shyte again:D
 
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#11
Never seen a flaring tool like that Mastercool 72485, see the dies are both in English (GM pretended they invented the English measurement system and called it SAE units.) and metric. $330.00 is kind of steep for a one time user.

I used my New Britain double flare on my last GM AT coolant lines that I purchased in around 1953, was adding brakes to trailers, plus lot of brake line replacements driving in road salt for the last 68 years. See that Mastercool has special dies for GM, did GM reinvent the most reliable double flare again?

Bubble flare kit is from OTC that was purchased around 22 years ago, for these stupid flares, had to remove the entire fuel line, no way to use this tool under the vehicle, need a large shop vise.

Untreated steel was and is the major problem, rusts from the outside in. See on some newer vehicle these lines have a rubber or plastic jacket should last longer. Worked on my son's 2010 Dodge Nitro, lines are still good after ten years.
You also need several tube bending tools, no way to bend these with your hands without kinking them.

First car with hydraulic was a 1937 Olds, went to my friendly wrecking yard, just got in a 37 olds with all new brakes, lifted up the car and tossed old wheel with tires on them, I removed everything and put in a large bushel basket. Charged me two dollars, also other goodies off this car, like door handles and light bulbs.

Brakes were real simple back then, single master cylinder and just one brake line, ABS with four can be a PITA. One fuel line, no transmission lines with a manual.