2001 Buick Lesabre relearn procedure

The old man

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#1
Okay, I really need some information on relearning procedure on 2001 Buick Lesabre when putting a new crankshaft position sensor in, without having a crankshaft relearn procedure on my scanner. My scanner does not have that option on it. It says I need a crankshaft relearn procedure when replacing a crankshaft position sensor on this Buick.

Do I have to do some kind of road trip or something like that?

I know Gus had some kind of relearn procedure for something like that.

Thanks for any information of this subject.
 
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#2
I'm can't say for sure, but you may only have to warm engine, then rev to limiter twice, then return to idle. Another possibility might be that you have to do nothing, because "the variation" is not large enough to set a code.

Alldata says...The crankshaft position system (CKP) variation compensating values are stored in the Powertrain Control Module (PCM) non-volatile memory after a learn procedure has been performed. If the actual crankshaft position system variation is not within the crankshaft position system variation compensating values stored in the PCM, DTC P0300 may set, refer to Diagnostic Aids for DTC P0300.

The Crankshaft Position System Variation Learn Procedure should be performed if any of the following conditions are true:
^ DTC P1336 is set
^ The PCM has been replaced
^ The engine has been replaced
^ The crankshaft has been replaced
^ The crankshaft harmonic balancer has been replaced
^ The crankshaft position sensor has been replaced

IMPORTANT:
^ Set the vehicle parking brake and block the drive wheels when performing the Crankshaft Position System Variation Learning Procedure in order to prevent personal injury. Release the throttle when the engine reaches the SECOND fuel cut-off. Leaving the throttle open during the fuel cut-off will allow the engine to decel at an even rate. Once the learn procedure is completed, the PCM will return the engine control to the operator and the engine will respond to the throttle position.
^ The scan tool crankshaft position system variation learn function will be inhibited if engine coolant temperature is less than 70°C (158°F). Allow the engine to warm to at least 70°C (158°F) before attempting the crankshaft position system variation learn procedure.

The scan tool crankshaft position system variation learn function will be inhibited if any powertrain DTCs other than DTC P1336 are set before or during the Crankshaft Position System Variation Learn Procedure. Diagnose and repair any DTCs if set.

The crankshaft position system variation learn function will be inhibited if the PCM detects a malfunction involving the camshaft position signal circuit, the 3X reference circuit, or the 18X reference circuit.
^ If the scan tool indicates a problem with the cam signal, refer to DTC P0341.
^ If the scan tool indicates a problem with the 3X crank signal, refer to DTC P1374.
^ If the scan tool indicates a problem with the 18X crank signal, refer to DTC P0336.

1. Set the parking brake.
2. Block the driver wheels.
3. Ensure that the hood is closed.
4. Start the engine and allow engine coolant temperature to reach at least 70°C (158°F).
5. Turn OFF the ignition.
6. Select and enable the Crankshaft Position Variation Learn Procedure with the scan tool.
7. Start the vehicle.
8. Apply and hold the service brake pedal firmly.
9. Ensure that the transaxle is in Park.
10. Increase accelerator pedal position until CKP system variation learn fuel cut-off is reached. CKP system variation learn fuel cutoff is reached at 5150 RPM. Release the accelerator pedal when the second fuel cutoff is reached.
11. The crankshaft position system variation compensating values are learned when RPM decreases back to idle. If the procedure terminates, refer to Important above for instructions.
12. Observe DTC status for DTC P1336.
13. If the scan tool indicates that DTC P1336 ran and passed, the Crankshaft Position System Variation Learn Procedure is complete. If the scan tool indicates DTC P1336 failed or did not run, check for other DTCs. If no DTCs other than P1336 are set, repeat the Crankshaft Position System Variation Learn Procedure as necessary.
 

The old man

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#3
I am hoping that is the case Danica about relearn procedure. I am taking the damper pully off now. Had to get "Big Daddy"(3/4" ingresoll rand impact ) to take that bolt off. Bid daddy don't fool around. Trying to figure how to take the damper off. No place to pry without ruining something. Can't find anything to put a puller on. Maybe a special puller, or maybe it is stuck a little. Have to investigate a little. Thanks for info.

I see what the puller looks like now. Anybody know what size bolts that scrrew into the balancer? I think I have a puller similar. If now I will make one I guess. I going to call autozone to see if they have that tool.
 
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#4

4. Remove the balancer bolt.

Important: Do not separate the pulley from the balancer. Service the pulley and the balancer as an assembly.

5. Use the J 38197-A in order to remove the crankshaft balancer. Attach 1/4 inch bolts to the pulley. Screw the bolts in 1/4 inch.
6. Clean and inspect the crankshaft balancer.
 
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#5
Homemade puller info here...but I think you have enough experience to figure this out yourself.
http://www.mccgp.com/upgrades/caminstall/caminstall_print.php
 

The old man

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#6
Auto zone had one that I can rent or keep. If I keep it it will cost me $21. I could not begin to make one for that money. Now is it will only do the job. Let you know later.
 

The old man

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Well I got the crankshaft pulley off with the puller that Autozone had, but had to use my 1/4 x 28 thread pitch bolts that I had with a smaller puller. There bolts were 5/16 and 3/8 in their box. Thanks to Danica, I knew it had 1/4 inch bolts at least. There were no check engine lights light at any time, but it acted up like it does about every three months or so. Where you have to pull over and turn it off and restart it. The only clue that I got this time was that there was a crankshaft position sensor code in the history code that never ever was there before. Also this time, my son, who is driving the car now, saw that the Tach was not working until he reset it by restarting the car. I took those two clues and changed out the Crank Sensor. I hope it fixes the problem. Time will tell I guess. Hard to pin something down when it only happens every three months or so. We warmed it back up and reved it up twice to the limiter and took it back down and drove it out on the highway and it run great. Thanks for the input Danica.
 

Gus

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#9
Unfortunately, the only way I know how to do the crank relearn is with a GM scan tool......P1336 will be set, and may cause problems.....I've never heard of a "manual" procedure to do the crank variation relearn....
 

The old man

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#10
I never did get a p1336 code, even in history. I wish I remembered the code number that i got, but it said something about the crank position postion sensor signal. The reason that I went ahead and put a crank sensor in even though at the time I put in on the lift, the car was running fine and the tach was ok. But the day before when my son come over, he said that the car was running like it was starving for gas and missing, and the tach showed zero. When he left for home the tach was working and ran fine. The history of this car is that it will about every two or three months, stall out or run like it run out of gas. When it did it on me the three times when I had it, I had to pull over and restart the car and everything would be ok till the next time it wanted to act up in a couple month, give or take a few. When I saw the crank sensor code in the history of the scanner, I took it for a opporunity to maybe cure the problem by changing out the sensor. It was the first time that code was set in history since I had it. Time will tell if I guessed right.
 
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#11
Sure it wasn't a dirty connector? Just super thin copper wire wrapped around a permanent magnet core, could be a flux connection, or even a slight break in the wire due to thermal cycling.

On that 92 DeVille, if I just opened the battery terminal for a second, would have to go through a 15 minute learning procedure for the idle control. Don't have to do that for my old 454 CID, doesn't have an idle control, doesn't need one.

Initial timing when adjustable was extremely critical, not so much at idle, but at higher speeds. Can only wonder about some of those cheap brackets on CAS's. No timing marks, can't even get to the spark plugs on these newer cars, and if you could, no specifications on initial timing. Guess they figure those anti-knock sensors will do the job.

Guess I need an education on how to use a scanner to make adjustments to a CAS.
 

The old man

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#12
Could be something like you said NickD. How do you find out something like that when it only happens every couple of months. The crank sensor is mounted very solid. Wire connector looked good and clean when I inspected it when it was off. Connectors on the old crank sensor looks good also. I am just going by my gut feeling that says that might have been the problem. I don't think it was a heat problem because when you restarted it, it would runs fine for a couple months. But, it did happen this last time on my son two days in a row come to think about it. Maybe it was getting worse is why it finally set the cranks sensor code.
 
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#13
Another thing I failed to mention is that dreaded single shorted turn. Reduces the pulse amplitude to what us dump engineers say into the uncertainty zone.

Is a piece of test equipment called a shorted turn detector, fires a quick pulse to the coil and expects a return pulse of nearly equal amplitude, but of opposite polarity. Will even use that on a new sensor, don't have to tell you about the work required to change these things.

If were layer wound, vacuum varnished impregnated, with ultrasonically welded contacts and plated terminals, silastic dipped for epoxy and therma isolation, would last forever. But try and sell that to marketing if this adds a few cents to the manufacturing cost. As it is, randomly wound coils, very little insulation, and unplated terminals, dipped in epoxy raw that can break those little coils.
 

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#14
Your are thinking the way of a Engineer that wants to create an item that will last through eternity. Even go to the moon if needed without problems. The chief financial officers of the institutions do not want it to last forever. It is all about profit to the maximum. The only way they can do that is sales on parts etc. after the purchase of the original item such as a car. Big, Big money in aftermarket. I have bought three Kindle readers in the last five years. The screen went out on the first, the second one won't charge anymore, and who know on the third. Great product while they last through. I bought them for my wife who is legally blind in one eye and the books actually read to her, and she can enlarge the print to a couple words per page if she want to. Over and out.
 
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#15
As a kid growing up in Chicago, could go to the local park and find an empty beer or pop bottle, was worth an ice cream cone at he local grocery store. Kids can't do that anymore.

APRA had a long seven year battle with the IRS, they were valuating cores, not at a dime a pound, but at their resale value. APRA finally won that battle, but at that time, over 7,000 parts rebuilder's went out of business. EPA is putting pressure on manufactures to limit the number of different materials that can be used to make recycling easier. Their idea of recycling is not replacing a worn bushing, but a complete meltdown.

The last 20-25 years of my career, was not to make parts better, but cheaper. Ha, was even told to do what comes natural at home, so I wouldn't be using the stockholders toilet paper. Not joking on this.