98 Stratus Oil leak (Massive)

kev2

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oops my bad does NOT use :-[ a oil pressure type tensioner...
 

NickD

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The way I like to start a job like this, is to take it some place to have the engine steamed cleaned first. Both top and bottom. But getting difficult to find places that do that anymore. When I was living in farm country, quite common for cleaning tractors and cheap.

Can use that gunk stuff and a pressure washer, but that leaves a mess in your driveway. Teased my neighbor about using his driveway when he is gone for the weekend. With a clean engine, easy to find leaks.
 

NickD

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This doesn't make a very good bedtime story:

"The 1,996 cc (1.996 L; 121.8 cu in) version of the engine was the first offered. Production began in 1994 in Trenton, MI, and it was used in many Chrysler Corporation vehicles. It is available in both SOHC and DOHC 4-valve versions. The engine features a cast-iron block, with pistons with shallow crowns to save weight.

The block uses a bedplate featuring a perimeter wall with transverse webbings for durability and quiet operation at high rpm's. The pistons are attached to fracture-split forged powdered metal connecting rods using semi-floating press-fit pins. A gerotor oil pump is driven directly from the crankshaft on the front of the engine. A reinforced rubber timing belt is used to drive the valvetrain. Early production 2.0 L engines used a hydraulic tensioner to tension the timing belt. 2000 and 2001 engines received a mechanical spring-loaded tensioner that tended to wear out prematurely, causing serious valve and piston damage upon belt failure due to the interference design of the engine. 2002+ engines utilized a different mechanical tensioner. The water pump is driven from the timing belt, with the water pump housing cast partially into the engine block itself.

1995 model year engines had three features that set them apart from later model year engines. The positive crankcase ventilation (PCV) system utilized a plastic oil separator box that was vented directly to the block itself; the breather hose and PCV valve hoses attached to the box, and connected to the induction system. Later model year engines featured a PCV system that was molded to the cylinder head valve cover. The second feature was internal in nature - the crankshaft main bearings were keyed into the bedplate on the right rear of each transverse web. Later model years featured keys machined on the right front of each web. These considerations are important when considering a rebuild or replacement of this engine in a given vehicle. The third feature would be a slightly bigger cam that was changed on 1996 and up SOHC vehicles due to a rough idle when the A/C was on. This 1995 cam is now being sold by dealers as a power upgrade for 1996 and up SOHC engines, but it can also easily be found at auto recyclers or salvage yards for a cheap price.

2002 and earlier model year engines featured a one-piece cast nodular iron crankshaft with counterweights present on either side of each crank pin. A crankshaft tone wheel was present between number 1 and number 2 connecting rod pins, and was machined such that a Hall-effect magnetic pickup mounted to the engine block could read the position of the crankshaft as it rotates during normal operation. 2003 and later model year engines switched to a two-piece crankshaft. The tone wheel was re-engineered to attach to the crankshaft using three bolts, had a tone pattern that was substantially different from previous model year engines, and was moved to the rear of the crankshaft. For this reason, these engines are generally not interchangeable between the 2002- and 2003+ model years.

Up to late 1999, this engine type suffered from oil leaks between the block and cylinder head. The threads for the head bolts near the 4th cylinder were bored too shallow at the factory, preventing the head from properly sealing. The oil restrictor in the composite gasket would separate from the gasket causing a leak. Chrysler Corporation used several different designs of composite material head gasket in an attempt to solve this problem. In 1998, a thicker multi-layer steel head gasket was introduced that eliminated this oil leak. It can be identified by a small metal tab with a hole through its center sticking out between the block and head between the 2nd and 3rd cylinders."
 

buzzstpoint

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If the head is leaking, it "should" be by the #4 cylinder. Correct?

Unless I'm thinking wrong, the #4 cylinder would be toward the transmission. Right? # 1 would be next to the timing belt.

you can see a metal type gasket on the engine, but it' not just by cylinder 2-3, you can see it stretch across the whole head.

Guess the only way to really find out is to start pulling off the front part of the engine, piece by piece. to see where it's leaking from.
 

ironhead

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Judging by the way the oil is squirting out of there, I would have to believe that the gasket between the block and the oil pump has failed and is leaking on the pressure side of the pump.
Guy
 

opelgt

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I have to agree with Cheef. I have also seen the camshaft seals dislodge and leak badly, split and leak badly and just shrink with age and leak badly.
 

greasemonkey

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With a leak that bad you should have no problem finding it once you take the timing covers off. You can run the engine with the covers off and check for the leak. That is a really bad leak. Greasemonkey :)
 

NickD

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2.0L tis a SOHC interference engine and with a camshaft bearing leak, this thing is probably rotting away from oil soakage.

 

buzzstpoint

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I figured on replacing the timing as long as I was in there.
Started yesterday but was stopped at the balancer.
Can't find the dodge puller at any of the rental stores.
 

Mobile Dan

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I think my local Advance Auto carries that tool with a buy-return for refund policy. Yes...I am aware that normal designs of pullers won't work. Make sure the set comes with ALL the pieces. I believe that engine will require the longest 'push rod'.
 

buzzstpoint

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Found the problem.
Camshaft seal, Seen is sitting out of the head when I pulled the re3ar cover off.
My question is, How is this seal suppose to hold in there? Is there a plate missing? Can't be the rear cover that holds the seal in place?. The hole for the camshaft in the rear cover is larger then the seal.

As for the timing belt. It look brand new. Kinda like it's been replace not too long ago.
Btw, the seal was out like this when I pulled the cover off.

 

greasemonkey

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There is no plate or holder for the seal it is held in by the rubber coating of the seal when it is installed. i would buy the seal from chrysler and would also replace the belt due to oil contamination. HTH Greasemonkey :)
 
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