A challenge for NickD...

billr

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#1
You have often mentioned opening up small. sealed, ball-bearings (even new ones) to clean out "inferior" grease and put in your favorite. So, how do you open those? The only way I can see is to insert a small blade between the inner lip of the seal and the bearing inner race and pry up. This seems certain to bend the seal, if not cut the seal lip. I have several bearings on an ancient lathe that need attention.
 
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#2
Definitely not on the inside, the seal there deals with a rotating member and do not want to ruin it. Just use a small jewlers flat blade screwdriver on the outer edge of the seal. Want to angle out to get under the edge then just pop it out. If you do tear it, when you pop it out, can use a sealer to repair it, but I have never done this.

Just lay the seal flat centered for the inner, work around the outside with your thumbnails to push it back in.

Just one small bearing use choke and carb clearer, larger, solvent, check the balls for roundness and the inner and outer races for wear. Three different types of cages are used, worse, and may find these in Chinese bearings, plastic, they go in the trashcan, dumbest thing I have ever seen, get hot, plastic melts and seizes the bearing. Second best is two halves spot welded, but this is all you can find in small bearings, best is riveted.

I use Wolf's Red High Temperature Bearing grease. In my now 50 year old air compressor 2 HP motor, when brand new, checked them at 25 years of still good, and a couple of years ago. Purchased a HE furnace about ten years okay, China crap, can you believe Shielded Bearings?

Metal plate opened around the inner race, open so grease can leak out and dust gets in, son had one like this, froze within the first year, but at least warranty covered. With his and mine found made in the USA is a metric fractional bearing with seals. cleaned those with Wolf's, still running fine after ten years. These motor do not have oil holes.

Also put a tach on the blower, no difference in speed between 120 down to 100 VAC, told me insufficient windings and an over hot running motor, had to design a voltage dropping circuit to run it much cooler. Kind of forgot after ten years, but the input current dropped something like 4 amperes. Reason why I say we are getting shit from China.. We got along just fine without them from the beginning of this country to about 19 years ago.
 

billr

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#3
Well, that made sense: pry out at the OD knowing it will get damaged, but not really matter. I'll have to straighten those metal pieces, but the rubber seal on the ID is OK. The ball cages are plastic, but so is the grease now! These are low-speed/load, should last fine.
 
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#4
When I open a sealed bearing, I begin by treating seal to liberal amount of silicone spray...this cleans, lubes, and softens "rubber" for the next step. Next, I push the entire seal off center, which kind of buckles the rubber at "the far side" and a tiny gap may begin to show at "the near side". Then gently push a tiny hook into the gap area and lift that part of the seal away from the groove in the outer race.
 

billr

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#5
Alas, these bearings are not made like that. The outer-most part of the seal is a steel shield (washer) that has only .008" radial gap between it and the inner race.
 
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#6
Put bearings in denatured alcohol first to clean and soften the seals, for get this step, ha sue me.

Sure can find crappy bearings, after my surgery, could not walk, but now need a rollator walker to get around with, slowly improving. But it really had crappy shielded bearings, that literally fell apart dropping their balls. Then for a 56 buck walker, wanted 28 bucks for more cheap replacements.

I found skate board bearings of exactly the same size but had to add a couple of washers for spacing. Sealed for more robust, and a package of four wa 8 bucks with free shipping. These will last.

Use to be all fractional, (inch) bearings in the US, now metric as well, as well as metric/fractional, then either no seals, shielded, or sealed. First time I was plastic cages was from shit for lack of a better word from China. Bearings also have an ABEC rating, used ABEC 12 for precision work, bearing do have some slop,12 is the minimum. Most are rated 1,000 hours at full load, but this time goes way up by using a larger bearing.

Sure loved Timken tapered bearings for wheel bearings, only had to replace one in my lifetime because it was never lubricated at the factory, can be cleaned and regreased. These lubricated for life wheel bearings are way overpriced and strictly throwaway and really a pain to replace. These cannot be opened for cleaning and wonder what kind of animal fat China is using for lubrication.