Blower Motor tapped to work

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#1
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MAKE:Ford
MODEL:Explorer
YEAR:2000
MILES:170,000
ENGINE
:4.6
DESCRIBE ISSUE....Over the last 2 months, my blower increasingly does not work at all. Some days all the settings, low to high work just fine. Other days I get nothing, even on high, as if it isn't even getting a current. However it is when I start the car is how it stays for the duration of that drive. I checked my blower fuses and relay. They were fine and seated solid. When I firmly tap on the blower motor it starts working. The contacts seem to be seated firmly. Am I safe in assuming I need to replace the motor.
 

nickb2

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#2
ok, without looking at the schematics. I would say 100% that resistor is shot
.

I would also look too see what is the amperage draw is when the blower motor starts up.
 

billr

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#3
Tapping on a DC motor to get it to work often indicates the brushes have worn and are too short to make good contact on the commutator. That is assuming this is a simple brush-type (either PM or wound field) motor, not brush-less, but that is a likely assumption for a "low tech" application like the blower. I'm also assuming this motor cannot be reasonably opened and replacement brushes are not reasonably available.

So, yeah, probably time for a new blower motor.
 
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#4
Please fill out the following to ask a question.

MAKE:Ford
MODEL:Explorer
YEAR:2000
MILES:170,000
ENGINE
:4.6
DESCRIBE ISSUE....Over the last 2 months, my blower increasingly does not work at all. Some days all the settings, low to high work just fine. Other days I get nothing, even on high, as if it isn't even getting a current. However it is when I start the car is how it stays for the duration of that drive. I checked my blower fuses and relay. They were fine and seated solid. When I firmly tap on the blower motor it starts working. The contacts seem to be seated firmly. Am I safe in assuming I need to replace the motor.
 
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#7
Sure couldn't repair the blower motor out of my kid's 2000 Taurus after 120K miles, nothing left of it. They don't make them like they use to. Found a new Motorcraft on ebay for around 40 bucks and really suggest you stick with one. If you think Motorcraft is crap, ha, should see some of the aftermarket units.

Yours actually lasted 170K miles? Time I started to believe in miracles. Can't even drive these vehicles anymore without a blower motor.
 
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#8
Probably a good idea to find a Motorcraft versus a salvage one that has questionable life on it. So is it worth replacing the resistor also since it will be very accessible after I get to the blower motor?
 

nickb2

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#9
For the price and while your in there, I would replace the resistor. I think it is only three bolts to remove and 17$ from your local ford dealer.

I hope you don't have big hands. LMAO. I am a small guy. 5foot 7inches. But my shoulders are 42 inches wide and my hands are way too big for my size.

See # 8 of following snapshot.
Screenshot (221).png
 
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#11
If I go back as far as the early 70's, a new blower motor from the dealer was six bucks, no permanent magnets back then, had machined pole pieces with magnet wire wrapped around them, replaced by molded permanent magnets, much cheaper. Only lubrication for the two bushings was an oil wick, this hasn't changed, but still no way to oil them.

Bushes had a high copper content, and commutators were thick copper, today, copper foil is more like it. Bushings were a dime each and two new brushes were a quarter, and the casing was held with two screws. So why pay six bucks when I could make these motors like new for 45 cents?

Even around 20 years ago, my Honda dealer wanted 250 bucks for a new blower motor, still had screws, but had to grind down a set of starter brushes could still buy with high copper content for a couple of bucks. That motor lasted a lot longer than that car did.

Blower wheel use to have a nut on the end of it, that was changed to a palnut, but still removable. To save cost on that palnut, used magnetic induction to heat the end of the armature shaft to press on the blower wheel. No way to remove that without breaking it, and for this POS, price increased to over a hundred bucks. Permanent magnets could be molded for pennies, commutators became foil.

Not easy getting old with all this new BS. Wouldn't be bad if our paychecks increased by a factor of 20, minimum wage back then was $2.25 per hour, that would be more like getting 45 bucks an hour today. How can anyone afford a vehicle today? All the blower motors are this way today, and this is just one small tiny part.

Could also make a fuel pump like new for a buck and easy to change, see these POS plastic made in China for as high as 450 bucks and strictly throwaway and positively miserable to replace.
 

nickb2

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#13
Ok, enough said, I have replaced enough "palnuts" to know my back hurts when doing this.

My internet research was productive. At least I learned a new word today.

Thx.
 
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#14
Some call it a pushnut, like to to call it a shitnut, saves drilling a hole for a washer and a cotter pin or a tenth of a second threading the end of a shaft with an automatic screw machine and using a threaded nut. Find these a lot on kids riding toys where they get hurt because a wheel falls off. Anything to save a cent in assembly.

Heavier ones are a bitch to pry off, but this is okay to pay somebody 90 bucks an hour to play with it for required maintenance to save a couple of cents in production. Not exactly a fan of palnuts.