bolt extractor ...the out come

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#1
this saw has been gathered to its ancestors
i ground the head off (i have the replacement bolt which is left hand thread )the bolt however the washed between the bolt & blade did not come off
i used a sharp edged pry tool & my wood workers light mallet with a light tap around the washer to see if it would loosen
i heard a loud nasty sound
the bearing housing cracked in 2 places
the blade still won't come loose (like its welded on) enough is enough
i have many tools from this mfg. all great untill the turn of the century when all mfg moved to china
now they sell what they call pro tools @ pro prices that are in fact bargain basement junk
so now i'm trying to find a made in usa saw
 

billr

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#2
Well, as long as you are having fun... that's what matters!
 
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#3
I guess I'm old...when you said "turn of the century" I thought you meant 111 years ago. About one minute later I decided you must be meaning the MOST RECENT turn of the century. I'm 53.
 
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#4
well i'm 65 & i feel like i'm only 35. . . . untill i go to do something
then i'm reminded of my age
any way with the mention of all data i took a look @ the site & was impressed
one of my vehicles is a 2008 suzuki sx4 4wd
usually when i purchase a car i get included in the price (after bargaining of course) a shop manual & parts discount arrangement
2007 was the last year a service manual was printed
2008 & above are asked to use the mfg website for service info @ $35 for a 30 day peek @ the service manual
i don't mind using the web but how greedy can they get charging like that for the info
as an owner i think a one time charge for unlimeted use (like when purchasing a manual ) is fair
so when i saw alldata was a low annual charge & all the info available it got my interest
annual fees from 3rd party providers i can deal with because untill the time when i need the service there has been no mutual investment
 

nickb2

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#5
Oh shit!! I'm about to turn 37. I'm screwed!! :ROFL

Get with the time mate, internet is how it is done.

We reprogram modules via CDS now!

OBD is past.

Internet is king when you need a good diagnostic.
 
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#6
Is the thread about the quality of tools? We sure knew how to make good tools in the 30's through 70's, practically all my drills, tap, and die sets are from the late 50's and early 60's. Did get a little reckless with my numbered drills between #55 and 80, really a difficult time finding those drills today. Nothing but crap on the market, just looking at them snaps them into two pieces.

My best bolt extractors, don't ask me where I got them are a set of the square tapered type. They don't care if they are rotated CW or CCW, they are square, can take a good pounding with a hammer for a good tight bite.

Got rid of my acetylene torch in around 1985 when I moved, tank rental was outrageous, but did get an oxy-mapp torch, kind of steep at 8 bucks for a gas filled oxygen tank, but okay for the small stuff. Have taken in some stuff like exhaust manifolds and brake calipers to my machine shop where they charged me a couple of bucks to heat them up, that always works. But not with brake calipers anymore, if you can even find the kits, more expensive than getting a rebuilt.

Use to work on a lot of 30's and 40's vehicle, breaking a bolt was unheard of, that started in the mid 50's and has been that way ever since. But outside of the engine on todays vehicles, don't even find bolts anymore, just plastic fasteners. Seem to break a lot of those, but again heat is the answer, to use a heat gun so they are more pliable and don't snap off quite as easily. But they do snap in a lot easier than snap out, think their thoughts on this, once you hit the end of your warranty period, is to trade if off. But that started off way back in the 50's when they invented rust.
 

nickb2

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#7
NickD, you gotta be at least 80!! That's 54 on me! I have only ever see 30"s and 40's cars in shows and stuff. My oldest car was a 71 pontiac GT37(lemans) like the one Paul Newman had in slap shot. Same color and options. That car was so primordial it was not funny.

I went over that car with a 1/2in and 9/16th sockets and wrenches. The 1/4in was for the dash bolts.

I had that car doing a 1/4 mile in 13.26!!
 
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#8
Started working on cars when I was ten years old in 1949, that makes me 72 years old. My very first car was a 1930 Olds, but had a ton of cars. A good Model A Ford sold for ten bucks. My neighbor was a Chrysler Plymouth dealer, did a lot for him when I was growing up. Until I was 18 and got drafted.
 

nickb2

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#9
I sometimes wish I would have lived in those years when things were simple and laid back. Except for the draft. I would not have wanted to go through that!

Props to you NickD. Sorry I aged you by 8 yrs. :thx
 
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#10
Hair wasn't turned gray yet and been able to control not getting a pot belly. Sure had my car work this spring, but not as easy to get up off the creeper. And seem to grab the wrong socket with metric, never and still don't have problems with fractional. That makes me cuss when I crawl under and grab the wrong size so end up with a shirt pocket full of sockets.

Sure had enough leaded gas pour on my face. What are they putting in unleaded? That stuff burns like hell! Or is that because I am getting old?

My latest hobby is removing unplated steel bolts from aluminum.