Exhaust Leak at flange 2005 Mercury Grand Marquis

Carl59

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Make
Mercury
Model
Grand Marquis
Year
2005
Miles
60000
Engine
4:6
Hi
Any way to patch this up for a while?
It’s past the catalytic converter but not too far away from it .

Seems it rusted at the flange.

aside from replacing the pipe or having it welded, is it possible to either cut out the flange and replace with a straight pipe section (but what would I do with the counter weight that’s attached to the flange?)

or is there some type of high heat putty or patch that I can put on that area for a while or is it too close to the catalytic converter to be of any good?

thanks
 

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paulo57509

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Looks like that's the converter-to-exhaust pipe flange?

You need to assess if it's rust, gasket, or combination of both. I would take it to a muffler shop. The might be able to cut off the offending parts and weld in something more permanent than putty/patch.
 

billr

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Sorry, but fixing that properly will take some welding.

Is that crack after the cats? Do you need to pass emissions testing? What standards, CARB or Federal? There are some weld-less patches I can envision, but may not be suitable for passing emissions.
 

Carl59

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Looks like that's the converter-to-exhaust pipe flange?

You need to assess if it's rust, gasket, or combination of both. I would take it to a muffler shop. The might be able to cut off the offending parts and weld in something more permanent than putty/patch.
Hi
Yes it’s the converter to exhaust pipe flange. The pipe rotted at the flange. Was thinking about cutting off a small section as possible and replace with a straight pipe section.
 

Carl59

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Sorry, but fixing that properly will take some welding.

Is that crack after the cats? Do you need to pass emissions testing? What standards, CARB or Federal? There are some weld-less patches I can envision, but may not be suitable for passing emissions.
Yes after the cat. No problem passing emissions the way it is. Would like to try weldless patch, but figure it is too close to heat from cat to stay viable for long.
 

billr

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If emissions are not an issue, then cutting away the damaged area slipping on a straight section with U-bolt clamps should work. The problem with putties is that they are no good if the leaking area is not "mechanically sound", if the edges of the leaking area can move relative to each other. A putty can seal a rusted out hole, with a glass-fiber or metal bandage over the area, but no good on a crack like you have. Putty could be used to seal that straight-pipe patch, but probably not worth the cost/effort of using the putty as the U-bolts should seal it up well enough. A slight leak there is of little worry.
 

paulo57509

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Looks like that's the converter-to-exhaust pipe flange?

You need to assess if it's rust, gasket, or combination of both. I would take it to a muffler shop. The might be able to cut off the offending parts and weld in something more permanent than putty/patch.
NOW I see the crack in the converter pipe.

I would think a muffler shop would be able to cut off the fractured portion and replace it with a new section pipe and flange. They'd be able to assess the best course of action.
 

Carl59

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Thanks for the replies. I will endeavor to cut out the damaged section and replace with a straight pipe.
should I putty putty when assembling the pipes together?
Thanks
 

Carl59

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If emissions are not an issue, then cutting away the damaged area slipping on a straight section with U-bolt clamps should work. The problem with putties is that they are no good if the leaking area is not "mechanically sound", if the edges of the leaking area can move relative to each other. A putty can seal a rusted out hole, with a glass-fiber or metal bandage over the area, but no good on a crack like you have. Putty could be used to seal that straight-pipe patch, but probably not worth the cost/effort of using the putty as the U-bolts should seal it up well enough. A slight leak there is of little worry.
Thanks for the reply. Thinking about cutting out the two flanges and replacing with the straight section as you mentioned.

So cutting away the two flanges and the gasket should not pose a problem?

What about doing away with the counter weight on the flange? Would hat cause a problem?

Thank you
 

billr

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I really don't see the weight in the photo, but I believe it would be to dampen harmonic vibrations that were found to be causing cracking of the pipe. A "patch" from the factory to ensure the exhaust would last through the required warranty period. Once you cut some pipe out and put in a different coupling, the harmonics will probably be changed; no telling if the weight would make things better or worse. Ignore it.
 
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