Fuel line help

oddone1975

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Apr 15, 2009
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235
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Make
Dodge
Model
Ram 1500 4x4
Year
1995
Miles
235,889
Engine
5.2
Fuel line gave out due to rust and am trying to get the piece out of the bell shaped piece that comes off the braided line as it comes down to frame and into steel lines
 

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billr

wrench
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Why? If that is a flexible line (hose) it is probably most practical to replace the whole line. I think that rusted nipple is crimped into the line. There are shops that can repair or replicate most any line, no matter how specialized it is; but will cost more than an OEM replacement.
 

Jim.M.

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May 14, 2015
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If memory serves me right, Push rusty line into connector a little, squeeze two plastic tabs toward rusty line wiggle and pull apart. Plastic lock should stay on rusty line when removed. May need some sort of lubricant around plastic connector depending on amount of rust.
 

billr

wrench
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I quickly concede that Jim may be correct, that rusted piece may be replaceable alone. I'm not familiar with that specific fitting type. However, with the rust I see, I still think it would be best to replace whatever that nipple goes into, even if it is the whole flex line.
 

oddone1975

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Apr 15, 2009
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yea being extreemly tight on funds i looked around down the garage and found a long section of rubber fuel line that was proper size and was able to trim the rusted line at a good section and just replaced it with rubber hose. None of the parts stores list the actual steel lines specifically for my truck or that piece that goes into the fitting so i decided best not to mess with it. so i'll say for now this issue is fixed what might come up next who knows can't complain too much trucks been for the most part reliable.
 

NickD

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Waste of time to write to the NHTSA, bunch of bureaucrats that respond to Lobbyist. Maybe if the whole nation would respond, they would do something about this problem. Doing a bit better on fuel tanks, in the 50's metal was thinner than on a can of beans.

Never was a problem with 30's and 40's vehicles, really been bad since the 50's, using these cheap steel fuel lines with no rust protection, than spreading salt all over the roads. Ethanol is another problem, usually rust from the outside in, with ethanol, both sides.

Also use to be just one fuel line with evaporative control, now three, fuel feed that requires a second return line to keep that cheap ass way overpriced piece of crap fuel pump inside of the gas thank that needs a constant flow of gas from keeping the dam thing from overheating. Third line for fuel pressure leak tests that is another down fall for even more leaks. Never was required for fuel injectors, completely closed system, but sure in carburetors. needs pressure air escape. And if you don't drive these vehicles daily, fuel evaporates from the reservoir, really have to crank you engine a lot if having and engine driven fuel pump. Really designed by smoke cracking idiots.

Nothing like waking up to have 24 gallons of gasoline all over your garage floor.

Double flare on the tubing was good, have this on your line about a half inch back, but so much better with a plated brass threaded fitting, than some push together crap. Double flare requires a two step operation, really poor bubble flare only requires one, so the bean counters won out on this one, screw the paying customer.

But this does not end up with fuel lines, some AH Standford professor with a huge grant from the government came up with a semi-rotating wheel having better traction on bare ice than a locked wheel that can be proved by a simple driving test to be 14% safer, now have four cheap brake lines to replace instead of two.

Another is transmission cooling lines, before you know it with a leak, your AT burns up before you feel any difference

Another is AC using this crap with dingbacks screaming about refrigerant losses. Almost next to impossible with a copper brass tube and fin condenser, super rugged compared to a parallel parallel flow paper thin aluminum condenser, one tiny stone and knock it out. Then leaking quick coupler fittings.

Don't depend on your airbags to save you for the material they are made of if -30*F with sensors made in China, living in a world where BS rules and sure plenty of that.
 

96eb96

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Jan 24, 2008
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Location
NY
I have that connector on the 96 Explorer fuel tank. Two of them. In 97, they changed to hoses and clamps. Cost savings but maybe warranty time too. It is a horrible design. Took an hour to get each off, I was trying to save the aluminum connector. Just lots of penetrating oil and cursing. The rust jacks the clips and makes for a permanent setup.
 

NickD

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Not fun, three fuel lines, four ABS lines and two AT coolant line all made of unplated steel, road salt sure doesn't help. In manufacturing, these lines are installed first, so when you try to work on them, most are buried. Typical on SUV's and pickups, ran on top of the frame before the bodies are dropped on. Can even find a fuel filter in some, cussing does not help.

Rigid pipe is sold by ID, tubing by OD, okay either inside or outside diameter, tubing is still all fractional sizes, but some idiot applied the nearest metric size, national pipe threads have not changed for the fittings, but that hex on the fitting was changed from what we use to call English to metric. Have to buy a whole new set of metric wrenches, kind made for fittings with five flats on them, if you use a standard open end with brass, will round off the brass.

Maybe I have cheated a little, used copper for fuel and AT coolant lines, a lot easier than still and does not rust., but for ABS with over 1,500 psi and pulsing, has to be steel. Paint that so it lasts five minutes longer.

Life so was much simpler with mechanical brakes manual transmission, and only one fuel line. With three line pressurized fuel lines, can go nuts trying to find a small leak. And fuel injector cars, another huge expense have a closed fuel system, so very few fumes are released into the air, but don't tell the EPA this, want to be super cautious.

On newer vehicles, moved the Purge valve and vapor canister to the rear of the fuel tank that save a line. When these two were mounted high on the firewall, no problems. But back there, water puddles splash into the vapor canister, worse is salt water from pouring salt on snow, highly corrosive, wrecks the canister and freezes up the purge valve setting a code that prevents from passing an emission test. And if you don't know anything about cars can cost you and arm and a leg for repairs.

In terms of preventing gas fume emissions, next to worthless. Gas fumes are over 3 times heavier than air, and as long as you don't have any leaks, and you will with all this crap, with fuel injectors, not an open carb, but that could be very easily cured, you will have your share of problems.
 
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