Kerosene in fuel tank

nickb2

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#16
This being a single pump direct, I would recommend low octane and an assiduous eye on that "MIL" light.

I am sorry I don't have experience with this type of mistake.

I am just used to using shop air and scan tool to actuate the injectors in actuator mode and just drive the heck out of the car/truck.

On a funny note, when a good colleague of mine was ready to tie the knot, I sealed his muffler and put antifreeze in the muffler. I knew he was going to propose. Apparently, he lost all visibility so much the white smoke left the two Quebec bridges in a cloud.

He actually called me that day. I felt a bit bad for the joke, he thought he blew a head gasket on his ranger.

I was hard pressed to tell him it was only a joke.

He took it so seriously, the next day when I was doing inventory, I say a ford head gasket kit.

I still think he hates for that joke, I said wait for the marriage to kick in.

He was a good guy, his father used to put my old stang GT away for free. He once had to move a older alfa romeo or maybe it was a spider, they both looked the same.

He double clutched it and the grass went flying back on the farm shed.

Quebec is a nice place to live. This is where I used to "entrepose" my cars.

 

mjs

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#19
Wow! good video..Just not a fan of the technology..Looks like lots of headaches down the road. Also have a buddy telling me the octane rating in kerosene is very high...Any truth???
 
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billr

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#20
Kerosene (diesel) octane-rating is very low, but the engine probably won't fire until most of the kerosene is flushed out. Don't make this over-complicated. Kerosene is a light oil and will do no damage to a spark-ignited engine, it just won't start until the kerosene is mostly flushed out. The fuel system doesn't have to be "squeaky clean", just get as much out of the tank as possible and then put in the correct fuel. The one thing to be cautious of is cranking the engine too long and over-heating the starter. Don't crank for more than about 5 seconds, then let it cool for a few minutes before trying again; it wouldn't hurt to have a battery charger handy, too. You may have to do this several times before the engine fires, kind of a time-consuming process, but she won't be doing this ever again, right?
 

mjs

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#21
Kerosene (diesel) octane-rating is very low, but the engine probably won't fire until most of the kerosene is flushed out. Don't make this over-complicated. Kerosene is a light oil and will do no damage to a spark-ignited engine, it just won't start until the kerosene is mostly flushed out. The fuel system doesn't have to be "squeaky clean", just get as much out of the tank as possible and then put in the correct fuel. The one thing to be cautious of is cranking the engine too long and over-heating the starter. Don't crank for more than about 5 seconds, then let it cool for a few minutes before trying again; it wouldn't hurt to have a battery charger handy, too. You may have to do this several times before the engine fires, kind of a time-consuming process, but she won't be doing this ever again, right?
LMAO!!!! I don't think so..I hope..
 

nickb2

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#22
If you have a buddy telling you kerosene is "high" octane. I would ask him if he is high!!

To ignite a low octane fuel, it takes some serious compression.

Something a gas spark engine cannot produce. The GDI system tries to reproduce a diesel system, but I foresee long term high end maintenance on this type of car.

If you want high octane for the quarter mile, buy this. This engine should run properly on 70% ethanol.

Putting aviation gas in that will probably cause more hassle than you think.The engine is not designed for that low octane.

http://gizmodo.com/5967240/what-happens-when-you-put-airplane-fuel-in-a-normal-car

Interesting read.

I had a friend that would bring a gallon of that nasty smelling stuff and he was convinced his car ran a better 1/4 mile because of it.

He never made the last runs, but the engine did keep together.

He was known as a sleeper car.

Think of it as this, remember when you were young and you went camping with a kerosene lanturn.

It is a slow burning fuel. http://jalopnik.com/5938552/why-you-really-shouldnt-run-jet-fuel-in-your-car
 

mjs

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#23
Hey!!! just wanted to say thank you for all your posts and replies. Fuel is out and car runs fine.. I did the work at the gas station with help from daughter. just wanted to post for future reference.....When I tried to siphon fuel from the main supply it would not let me get the fuel out even with a fuel pump attached to the end.... The only time I could get any fuel out was if the vehicle was running..Maybe the fuel module in the tank prevented me from siphoning or the GDI,"I don't know ". So I took the clamp off at the tank and the bolt that holds the tube. Comes apart easy peasy....
 
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#25
Ha, a Ford Model A would run on kerosene. They don't make em like they use to.
 

nickb2

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#26
Yeah Nickd, they were low compression engine. Those old heads only needed 60 or so foot pounds.

Will a ford model A run on kerosene. Yes, I probably will run on french fry oil.

Interesting and funny fact. Not my writing.

On this day, a young engineer at General Motors named Thomas Midgeley Jr. discovers that when he adds a compound called tetraethyl lead (TEL) to gasoline, he eliminates the unpleasant noises (known as "knock" or "pinging") that internal-combustion engines make when they run. Midgeley could scarcely have imagined the consequences of his discovery: For more than five decades, oil companies would saturate the gasoline they sold with lead--a deadly poison.
In 1911, a scientist named Charles Kettering, Midgeley's boss at GM, invented an electric ignition system for internal-combustion cars that made their old-fashioned hand-cranked starters obsolete. Now, driving a gas-fueled auto was no trouble at all. Unfortunately, as more and more people bought GM cars, more and more people noticed a problem: When they heated up, their engines made an alarming racket, banging and clattering as though their metal parts were loose under the hood.
The problem, Kettering and Midgeley eventually figured out, was that ordinary gasoline was much too explosive for spark-ignited car engines: that is, what we now call its octane (a measure of its resistance to detonation) was too low. To raise the fuel's octane level and make it less prone to detonation and knocking, Midgeley wrote later, he mixed it with almost anything he could think of, from "melted butter and camphor to ethyl acetate and aluminum chloride...[but] most of these had no more effect than spitting in the Great Lakes."
He found a couple of additives that did work, however, and lead was just one of them. Iodine worked, but producing it was much too complicated. Ethyl alcohol also worked, and it was cheap--however, anyone with an ordinary still could make it, which meant that GM could not patent it or profit from it. Thus, from a corporate point of view, lead was the best anti-knock additive there was.
In February 1923, a Dayton filling station sold the first tankful of leaded gasoline. A few GM engineers witnessed this big moment, but Midgeley did not, because he was in bed with severe lead poisoning. He recovered; however, in April 1924, lead poisoning killed two of his unluckier colleagues, and in October, five workers at a Standard Oil lead plant died too, after what one reporter called "wrenching fits of violent insanity." (Almost 40 of the plant's workers suffered severe neurological symptoms like hallucinations and seizures.)
Still, for decades auto and oil companies denied that lead posed any health risks. Finally, in the 1970s, the Environmental Protection Agency required that carmakers phase out lead-compatible engines in the cars they sold in the United States. Today, leaded gasoline is still in use in some parts of Eastern Europe, South America and the Middle East.
 
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#27
We people have what is called a brain blood barrier that is suppose to keep these toxins away from our brains, some are less effective that makes people aggressive and stupid and want to run for political office. Lead in gasoline was not completely phased out until the late 1980's. Hitler could have been victim of excessive lead poisoning, he did want to become a great artist.

Its other good effects in engines was to reduce the combustion chamber temperatures from 2,600 down to 2100 *F, while water injection was considered, I was there, EGR became the standard that also has the effect of reducing the engine displacement up to 30%. EPA is adding lots of additives like MBTE's to fuels to reduce HC emissions, but causing cancer instead.

Historically, our engines are not any different than the Model T Ford that is now over a hundred years old, really no progress whatsoever. Major difference is that computer chips were added, so the average person can't repair their vehicles anymore.

In the 70's, EPA enforced all vehicle to have a catalytic converter, 1972 to be exact, but still importing huge quantities of high sulfur gas from the middle east. So while reducing HC's, air was getting pumped full of sulfuric acid that can burn the hell out of your lungs. So much again for progress.
 

nickb2

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#28
Nickd, you never cease to amaze me with your wealth of information.

However, I thought they banned the use of this additive a decade ago or so. Are you saying they are STILL adding it?

I tried to find proper data on this, but I am getting conflicting articles and information.

One site says this another says that. http://abc7news.com/archive/7286029/

On a side note, what is taking so long for the industry to follow through with hydrogen?

You can run a car on cow farts if you wanted to. Useless ppl even want to tax methane and profit from this very natural resource.

Call me uneducated, but Al Gore was against this in his save the whales and save the planet analogy. http://www.genifuel.com/technology.html

This nasa video still impresses me. The proof is in the pudding.

It is a clean as any renewable fuel I have ever seen.

 

nickb2

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#29
If it is good for deep exploration, why not for daily planetary commuting?

Cows and pigs have been around way longer than before the human mind could even think about lean burn fuels.

Did the planet fall to hell? No. One comment made me laugh. The comment went along these words. "This is nothing new, I do that in the bathroom every Chipotle night."
 

Gus

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#30
Long ago, I remember a Lucerne coming in for a no start......checked fuel pressure, checked for spark, compression, injector pulse...all ok.....I was stumped.......I had a cold at the time and didn't notice the smell of the fuel...

Then we heard, that the local gas station, had a delivery screw up...diesel was filled in a regular gasoline tank......called customer, and sure enough, he bought fuel from there.....back then we had a pressured container, that you could attach to the fuel rail(disable fuel pump and fuel supply line), and add fuel and injection cleaner, to clean the injectors.....I just put clean fuel in, and after several tries, was able to get the car to start and run ....since the car was under warranty, called GM, and they recommended dropping the tank to clean/remove all fuel(no easy job), blowing out the lines, replacing the injectors and also the fuel pump, and blowing out the rail(they were worried about the kerosene having an effect on the injectors and fuel pump).....the gas station's insurance company was paying for all repairs, so no problem......

I remember the first direct injection systems had two fuel pumps...the first was to pump the fuel up to 40 psi, and the second one increased it to high pressure, for direct injection......when ever you had to work on those high injection pumps, ANYTHING you took apart, had to be replaced.....there was no reusing of parts for fear of a leak under high pressure on these engines...