No particular make or model - sealant

tercr6

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Back about 25 years ago there was a sealant in a stick that I used to seal a gas tank pin hole .

You just clean around the area of rust,etc. and rub it in/on.

It works even when wet ,as I did ,and it worked .

Does anyone remember the product name ,and I wonder if it is still sold ?
 

JackC

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Sounds great. Never used it.

I have had success with J-B Weld, but not on a "wet" gas surface. It must be dry.
 

tercr6

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It could have been this :

http://www.amazon.com/Permatex-12020-Instant-Repair-stick/dp/B000ALG8RS
 

dabunk

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All the autoparts near us carry it even Pepboys. Just used it a couple of weeks ago. Seal the hole with the stick and then epoxy over the area. Do not remember the name of the company now but it was in the same area as the epoxies
 

NickD

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Could report that leak to NHTSA, good way to waste a couple of hours of your time.
 

Jim Fairbanks

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I did have a little trouble getting it to stick where it was leaking out and was wet, but it worked...If you can put it on when it is dry it works real good...Jim
 

NickD

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Year, make, and model would be interesting. Only tin fuel tanks I have left is on my motorhome made from 1/4" thick steel, Supra tank is also metal, but built like a Sherman tank. Last vehicle I had with tank problems was a 67 Mustang, tin cans were better than that. Neighbor ran a shop, going back to the 60's and used some stuff to repair that when a tiny stone hit it. Know it lasted a couple of years until I got rid of that POS. But now I see it would be a very valuable car.

Dropping tanks was very common particularly in the 50's through the 80's, drain and cleaned them, used a propane torch after drying it out with an outlet from a shop vacuum. Followed by a good paint job with a thick coating of undercoating, would last a little longer that way. Really don't object to plastic.
 
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