RH Front flasher inop

jigfeett

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#1
Make
ford
Model
e150
Year
1997
Miles
235001
Engine
5.4
I noticed the right front flasher light does not work, but on blinker it does work, the turn indicator in cluster does not work on flasher but does work on blinker.
All other flashers work and all blinkers work.
I replaced the bulb twice same results.
Not sure where this is going to lead me so just throwing it out for suggestions.
I will follow the trouble tree tonight when I get home, power and ground and socket tension.
Thanks
 

billr

wrench
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#2
"Blinker" = directional turn signal, "flasher" = hazard warning? Those probably use two completely different modules to effect the lamp on/off operation; we need a schematic. It is probably not a problem with bulb/lamp/socket.
 
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#6
Front right parking/directional signal lamp socket on my motorhome was badly corroded and has a spring under that terminal board that rusted away. Only choice was to go to an auto supply store and buy a new socket.

Flashers whether mechanical or electronic require a given amount of current flow to operate. Typical current for a directional is 2 amperes, with two, that's 4 amperes, one bulb out, not even to trigger it.

Bayonet sockets if plated were very reliable, then some bean counters came out with a wedge type socket, bulb barely stuck in there, but the stock holders loved them no brass base to solder and glue on, more profits, but a PITA for the consumer.

Some people with a poor socket and lack of directional signals were shot to death.
 

jigfeett

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#7
Fixed! I cleaned the socket where the bulb inserts and then cleaned the 3 terminals that the socket plugs into.
I use these tiny round wire brushes that are used for cleaning paint sprayer units. Before cleaning I had high resistance on the ground and after cleaning good to go. Interesting point the plug and socket did not look dirty or corroded and the diagnostic tree would have had me replace the flasher and the multifunction "turn signal" switch so on that note even if it looks good clean it.
Thanks
 

billr

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#8
Hmm... I guessed wrong on this one; the problem was in the bulb/socket area!

The moral of the story? Just seeing a lamp light up, hearing a motor whir, or seeing a squirt from a fuel rail isn't really good enough to diagnose accurately. You need to use a gauge to get a quantitative measurement. In this case, using a voltmeter down in the bulb socket area would have revealed the bad contacts. That's my excuse and I'm sticking to it!

Of course, just cleaning the contacts, "just in case" was a lot easier and more practical than probing in various ways with a meter...
 

jigfeett

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#9
some times the simple things make it happen. When I looked at the contacts they did not look bad at all but even a clean look can be a bad connection.