Very rusty fuel injectors

96eb96

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Location
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Make
Ford
Model
Explorer
Year
96
Miles
170000
Engine
4.0 OhV
I wanted to replace a gasket and the fuel injectors had to come out. Some are extremely rusty on the body. I'm doing this job because a valve cover flange rusted out.

I may have to replace one injector because it got damaged removing. It was one with the intake. Now, I'm thinking of replacing all with a reman set from a reputable seller.

A few years ago I changed an grand marquis intake manifold, put everything back, and an injector had a nice pinhole leak near the o-ring. The original undisturbed o-ring was sealing it.
 

billr

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Is there a question there?
 

96eb96

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Is there a question there?
Yeah, I guess I answered it. Probably best to replace all, my question was if I should keep the rusties.
I was thinking of just getting one.
 

billr

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Rust on exterior, non-sealing, surfaces is only cosmetic. If the engine was running OK before, I would just replace the damaged injector. It all depends on how wealthy you are...
 

NickD

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Are a bit more expensive than say rebuilding a four barrel carburetor for ten bucks that doesn't need an over thousand buck PCM to drive them. A four barrel carburetor can be adjusted to a 14.7:1 stoichiometric fuel ratio. But this is the hole key fuel injectors and that PCM along with other sensors, EPA does not want anybody to adjust these. Same with distributorless ignition systems.

My 36 year old home AC just died, R-22 was 30 cents a pound, R410A had far greater operating pressures, and cost over 20 bucks a pound, but claim it does not contain a very small amount of chlorine that can harm the ozone layer that was proven to be a dirty rotten lie by NASA but pushed by crooked Al Gore. So now have to pay a fortune for this stuff including your automobile all based on lies.

When I first started working with Japanese engineers claimed that American drivers are stupid and know nothing about their vehicles, no argument here, and also vote for crooks that are screwing the hell of us. Injectors have to open and close over 50 times per second, gum up, leak, subject to electrical problems and real not much gain if any over a carbureted system if set up correctly. But very few know how to do this.

Even in our small engines idle and run mixture adjustment screws were eliminated, for no user adjustments. Because of this the cost of automobiles and repair work has skyrocketed, and are we even better off?
 

96eb96

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Rust on exterior, non-sealing, surfaces is only cosmetic. If the engine was running OK before, I would just replace the damaged injector. It all depends on how wealthy you are...
I just want you to know though I had an injector with a major leak at tip (the lower o-ring area). It had a plastic body and a metal tip. That was the Ford skinny injector though. My explorer ones are fat. Maybe it was a freak thing but it motivated me to consider new ones. If I didn't give a last look, there would have been a fire. A reman set is $50, with a lifetime warranty, from a place with perfect 1000s of perfect feedback. I went for it.
 

96eb96

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Are a bit more expensive than say rebuilding a four barrel carburetor for ten bucks that doesn't need an over thousand buck PCM to drive them. A four barrel carburetor can be adjusted to a 14.7:1 stoichiometric fuel ratio. But this is the hole key fuel injectors and that PCM along with other sensors, EPA does not want anybody to adjust these. Same with distributorless ignition systems.

My 36 year old home AC just died, R-22 was 30 cents a pound, R410A had far greater operating pressures, and cost over 20 bucks a pound, but claim it does not contain a very small amount of chlorine that can harm the ozone layer that was proven to be a dirty rotten lie by NASA but pushed by crooked Al Gore. So now have to pay a fortune for this stuff including your automobile all based on lies.

When I first started working with Japanese engineers claimed that American drivers are stupid and know nothing about their vehicles, no argument here, and also vote for crooks that are screwing the hell of us. Injectors have to open and close over 50 times per second, gum up, leak, subject to electrical problems and real not much gain if any over a carbureted system if set up correctly. But very few know how to do this.

Even in our small engines idle and run mixture adjustment screws were eliminated, for no user adjustments. Because of this the cost of automobiles and repair work has skyrocketed, and are we even better off?
I think FI is a major improvement over carbs. These injectors served me well for 170K miles. No carb would last that long without any major work. I could have probably kept them, but the rust bothered me. A matched set of injectors is $50.

My briggs and stratton opposed needed a carb rebuild, $25 shipped for an OEM kit. You also have to drain the gas or it will likely not start in the spring.

Not saying carbs and bad but no carb could maintain the precision control of Fuel injectors and meet emission requirements. That expensive PCM can compensate and meter each cylinder with precision. Carbs can't do such a thing, maybe there were feedback carbs but they are not really reliable.

I mean, I have a Lexus GS, a 2 ton car, gets 27ishMPG on long highway runs. It has two sets of injectors for high and low pressure. Also gets 306HP out of a NA 6. Doubt that would happen with a carb. And if it did, it would be a gross polluter.
 

billr

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I suppose I should have asked for you to post pictures of the rust. Yeah, if you think it is bad enough that a hole has rusted through, then they are trash. As always, I try to give reasonable advice; but I am not "on site" to do the actual inspection or work. Your opinion is the one that matters the most for you.
 

NickD

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1965 bought me a 65 Buick Electra four door hardtop, loaded for $2,500.00, also gave me 20 mpg until Nixon cut the speed limit to 55, that dropped it to 17 mpg, was tuned for 70 mph. A buck back then
would costs about 8 bucks today.

Try and find any vehicle today even close to $20,000 as that same vehicle would cost today with inflation. Closest thing to it not even close would be over $50K. Could rebuild that fuel pump for a buck in less than 20 minutes, today to get it down if you can't do it yourself, over 1200 bucks and a sloppy job at that.

Just comparing the old with the new, and I actually put 320K miles on that car without major problems, the real major problem started on 1975 when they started dumping tons of salt on roads. Sure developed a lot of rust holes. This kid misses the good old days. Oh, only one fuel line.
 

96eb96

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I suppose I should have asked for you to post pictures of the rust. Yeah, if you think it is bad enough that a hole has rusted through, then they are trash. As always, I try to give reasonable advice; but I am not "on site" to do the actual inspection or work. Your opinion is the one that matters the most for you.
In rustopia here, if there is any flaking and missing metal I usually err on the side of caution. Almost every metal tube was replaced on the truck. Some may be ready for seconds. Cosmetic rust generally does not have texture. Lets just say these have an extra dimension :)
 

billr

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I am in California (and away from the coast). "Rust" here is just a brown patina, like weathered copper.
 

96eb96

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I am in California (and away from the coast). "Rust" here is just a brown patina, like weathered copper.
You are very lucky then. Here trucks can actually lose weight and increase their MPG over rust.
 

NickD

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Well some shortcomings, like tsunamis, field fires, water shortages, landslides, and Christmas tree light wires that cause cancer in California rats. Also an exodus hitting that state due to high taxes.

Did turn down a government job in California, would have had to trade in my 4,000 square foot home for a pup tent to keep living expenses the same. Brother and sister moved down to Florida, but then had to put up with hurricanes. Not sure where is a nice place to live. Use to love it up here before road salt, makes a mess out of everything. Never was a problem with studded snow tires and nice clean fresh snow.

Can also blame Detroit, 1949 was the first year Detroit quit adding nickel to steel to make it rust proof, the rear Detroit rust was invented, but they had their own reasons, slowed down new vehicle sales.
 
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