Well Water

eddieguy

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I recently found a house in very rural small town in my home state Missouri on a realtor website and had my brother check it out for me because he lives a lot closer to it and it would appear to be a solid brick house

the price is cheap and it sits closer to the hwy than I would like there’s no heat but I think when I asked about the ductwork she did say it had it. The biggest hurdle is she said there was no water to the place and she thinks owner said it had to do with the lines that ran from the submersible pump for the well to the house. Sorry I don’t have anymore info than that

My question here is does anyone on here have any knowledge or experience with water wells? I thought wells could run deep so I have no idea in what I could be looking at in repairing this issue. Wish I could talk to the owner if anyone has knowledge or exp with well water please throw in here what they know about how they are set up. The pic is just to show the house and how close it sits to the hwy. it’s probably very low traffic flow though747ADEDC-251D-4392-AFF5-E63E57219314.png747ADEDC-251D-4392-AFF5-E63E57219314.png
 

billr

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Well depth depends a lot on the local terrain. Alongside a river or lake you may find water at 10' down; in other areas you may have to go down 250' (or more). And, of course, endless possibilities in between A call to a well/pump business in that local area can quickly get you an idea of how deep is typical. Regardless of the water depth, it is always pumped to the surface and distributed from there, the piping to the house will only be a few feet deep.

I would be more concerned with what the quality and future of the ground-water is. Some aquafiers that were viable in the past are now too low or contaminated to rely on, or even get a permit to use.

Same goes for sewage disposal. Is this on a septic tank, or just a "dry-well" that has to be pumped periodically?

I assume that road shown in front is the highway. What are the current set-back requirements that would have to be met if any improvements are made to the property? It is common to find that an old building close to a road has been "grandfathered" to allow it to remain as the roadway right-of-way is increased; but only until the property is changed or the full roadway needs to be put in use.
 

jigfeett

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Like Billr, said could be a easy fix or expensive. It might just need a repair, ie. new pump and lines to house and what ever is found inside the house as far as plumbing pipes. A small pump < $300 to $400? just guessing.
I know a community well for 9 houses is over $3000 for a new pump and back up installed but a single house should be much cheaper.
A lot of old homes back in the day were right on the road.
 

grcauto

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Call local well drillers and they will be able to tell you exactly where the water table is.
 

dabunk

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Ha wells my whole fixed an repaired most myself. Old house like that could even have a shallow dug well. My house here in Belize has a 150 ft drilled well and I just put a solar system in for our house. Get recommendations on a quality well company and pay them to check it out. Way to many variables in your scenario
 
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