What scope to buy for a busy Automotive shop?

nickb2

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#1
A co worker and I have been tasked to check out what is on the market scope wise in a complete master lit.


This thread will not be active long as the choice has to be made before quarter of business budget, whatever that means. All I know is we have a budget, but not for the PICO master kit, so that one is out and I will not respond to anyone saying I NEED a pico.

I sure as heck am not going to pay 5600$ us, in CAD, f no. My boss is a smart guy, buys good tools, but is not impressed with the price of that pico kit. SO he aske Gabrielle and me to look into a kit, we have come down to 4 or five. 1, being ridiculous, but workable, basically a work project and a waste of time, but will help learning curve greatly if we build it ourselves.

I really want this slovakian one. Gabrielle is very partial to this kit shown on scanner danner tech site for such things. Very informative btw. Here is his preferred "cheap option"

https://www.scannerdanner.com/forum/lab-scope-discussion/2046-hantek-dso3064-6074be-scopes.html

This one is my personal cheap option.


The slovakien one.


http://autoscope.eu/home/
 

nickb2

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#2
The one linked to in the danner forum, has no transducers, no pick up wands to do cam and crank sensor, or ignition coils etc. NOT a complete kit.

I did the math, for the slovakian one, it comes to about 2800$ cad, more for shipping, duh!

He has seniority, I have experience, I think I will let him have this one, but if I could, that slovania shyte sure looks well made compared to the hantek. Just buy pictures you see solid connections that will last, not that bnc crap that warps if you chinze out on adapters, like so many do.
 

nickb2

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#3
One of my responsibilities as a tech is a shop that has a CAA logo slapped on here and there, is that I have to do inspections on cars/trucks for buying ppl. Doing a relative compression reading takes no time with such kits, and gives you a lot of info if client is buying a shiney car with a wheezing soon to go car engine, fuel pump etc, or not.

I love taking these courses, now it is time to buy, who wins.

Third choice, ase wave.

https://www.aeswave.com/

Does good job of showing great stuff available and very reasonable prices. But not europe friendly, but seems to be china friendly. Choppy warranty when your not dealing with a direct vendor, especially when up grades are part of why you buy the tool. This is a never ending expansion of tech the auto industry is.

AES would be a good bet for warranty though. SO dice down to three now. For the complete kit. There really is a COMPLETE kit out there. But would really like some advice, go GUI friendly, or for complex for more precis?

Which is better? I say go GUI friendly, but that costs 4 grand, just for a gui. PICO style. The unit is nothing more than what you can get elsewhere. The pico is a software scam.

Some one has already open sourced long time ago.
 

nickb2

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#4
Taking apart most modern engines now days just to take a manual compression reading makes no sense at all. It is after all, a case for commoen sense. Do I rip apart your engine to take comp reading, or just hook this gadget up and see in 15 mins or so, and hardly touched your car. ??
 
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#6
My own vehicles, can't beat a manual compression check in particular if have a misfire problem.

Sun, Allen, Marquette, Snap-On all made scopes back in the 50's that was nothing more than a 15" TV chassis for showing the spark line of the ignition. Dumont pushed this back as far as 1948 with a five in tube. Swore you could find all kinds of problems by looking at the spark line.

For those huge console type monsters, dealers purchased those to impress customers more than any thing else. VW came up with a diagnostic type contraption that only read dwell and rpm, everything else was visual and plugged in by the mechanic. Some astronaut claimed it detected low fluid in battery cell 3# and he was impressed.

This was learned by the mechanic removing the back seat, battery cover, looking at the battery and unscrewing the #3 cap.

As an engineer, we used high end scopes by HP or Tektronix with various probes, such as high voltage, 50KV, current probes off all sorts, low or high frequency probes. Besides showing the waveforms included numerical data, as to frequency, voltage, rise and fall times. These were our eyes.

Shop manuals are still based on using a cheap VOM, volt ohmmeter, waste of time measuring the resistance of a coil, when just one shorted turn can kill the output of a coil. Scope shows that instantly, or the dwell time of an injector. Engineers give all this data to the manual department, they ignore it and say, just replace with a know good part.

But how do you know if a part is good or bad if they don't tell you how to test it? Automotive troubleshooting is a bad joke.


Designing an automotive product is easy, difficult is designing the test equipment to test it. For like an ignition module, can conduct over 300 tests in a second and either pass the component through or in the trash can.